How to Recycle/Reform Plastic Pieces at Home?

I am sick of throwing all the plastic bottles and packagings (PET, PS,
PP, PVC, etc.) into gargage because I know that most of them will end
up as landfills. Recycle strategy in Thailand still requires more
attention.
Could you please suggest me how (by what method) I can transform those
unwanted materials into more beneficial stuff?
Thanks
Reply to
Chaiwan
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PET, PE (including HDPE, LDPE and LLDPE), PP, PS, PVC and others all require a large amount of heat in order to reform the materials into any other shape. You will also need a good deal of pressure. You can use solvents as a processing aid, but that would most likely be counterproductive to your efforts. If you are interested in making "art" objects one at a time, you might be successful, but if you are thinking of making some deck planking for instance, that won't be possible.
John
Reply to
John Spevacek
It would take lots of energy and/or chemicals to recycle your plastic refuse in such small quantities. It is best left to a company who can handle it in bulk. You could separate and crush the materials and hull it to the recyclers if there is such a business in Thailand.
In my younger days, I worked at the warehouse of a company. They stored sales and marketing items there. One day they cleaned out the warehouse were discarding about 200 lbs. of new acrylic stands and display items into the dumpster along with tons of other junk. I asked them if I could take the acrylic items and I trash picked the rest of it that didn't get damaged.
I sold some of the stuff at a flea market and cut up the rest and used acrylic solvent to glue it into small, useful storage boxes.
John
Reply to
jriegle
Blecch, acrylic solvent. Given how fast I get a headache when I'm around Harvasolv, I bet that buying the boxes is cheaper than health insurance!
Cheers,
Phil Hobbs
Reply to
Phil Hobbs
Throw away the caps and put a flower with water in each of them. At least you will have got yourself "recycled" flower vases.
The moral of the story: putting together various thermoplastics, melting them, and mixing them up will not produce anything useful.
Regards A.Chandra
Reply to
Amit Chandra
Rather than melting, you might want to try slicing and dicing the stuff into very fine pieces/chips to make packing or filler material. Pack the pieces into waste plastic bags you then seal to make "pillows" for a lightweight packaging "wrap" or bag for protecting mailed items. Or maybe you could test how they affect the properties of building materials, like cement, or plasterboard, allowing the products to be put to use without ending up in landfill, and reducing the cost of materials. You'd need to test their influence though, to ensure strength and safety of the final structures are not adversely affected. If you could devise a simple way to cut the material so as to produce thin, long, wiry pieces (like hair), they may even entangle, producing a stronger structure!
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Reply to
barryn56
This site is just up your street...
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a great fun use for that plastic, and available in Thailand.
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Reply to
barryn56

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