Mechanism behind trumpet playing robot?

wrote:


A clarinet is a reed instrument, idiot.
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 17:56:03 -0800, ChairmanOfTheBored
Right I meant to use coronet
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default wrote:

Unless you're kidding... you mean *cornet* Randy
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sci.electronics.design, snipped-for-privacy@defaulter.net says...

A cornet is a bugle with valves. A trumpet has a straight pipe (2/3 straight - 1/3 tapered, IIRC) and a cornet tapered tube (2/3s tapered). The trumpet has a higher 'Q', thus a harsher sound. It's much like the difference between a trombone and baritone or euphonium. Same ratio of tapered to straight tubing.

I know that as a "triumphant trumpet"; the instrument they use at horse tracks for "The Call to Races". It is a trumpet, so has 2/3s straight tubing.

No, a short horn would give a higher pitch. The crisper sound is caused by straight tubing.

very
Look at the taper. The french horn is quite tapered with very little straight tubing. A trumpet or trombone has very straight tubing.
--
Keith

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Historically speaking you had your horns which were mostly tapered, including bugles. And your trumpets which were mostly constant diameter except in the first and last sections. But after the introduction of valves the difference in the amount of tapered tubing largely went away. Any tubing inserted by a valve must be the same diameter at both ends, so the more valves that are engaged the lower the proportion of tapered tubing to overall length. Further, the diameter of the tubing in each valve tends to be the same as they are usually located adjacent to each other without much room for taper in between. There have been some exceptions with fourth valves on euhphoniums and fourth and fifth valves on french horns sometimes using different diameter tubing, but by and large the modern valved instruments carry a high, and nearly equal, fraction of their overall length as cylindrical tubing.
Until the mid 1800's trumpets were valveless instruments, most popularly single coiled about 9 feet long and standing in D alto. Being longer than bugles, a typical player could access more of their overtones and thus obtain more notes than on the shorter valveless instruments.
Other historical divergences include the keyed bugle, and Adolphe Sax's first family of inventions, the saxhorns, which are saxophone- hinting bodies lip-blown with brass instrument type mouthpieces.
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In article <8bec1b13-595a-4254-bae2-35f7c8166b90
cs snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Not true. Look at a cornet next to a trumpet. The cornet has far more tapered tubing.

A cornet and trumpet have the same pitch (same length), yet sound quite differently.

Of course instruments changed along the line; euphonium/baritone, double-base recorder/tuba/sousaphone.
--
Keith

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But NOT in the valve area.
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sci.electronics.design, snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

Even in the rare cases you're right, you're still stupid.
--
Keith

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Fuck off, you little retarded piece of shit.
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sci.electronics.design, snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

Ah, now Dimmie, it's the holiday season. No need to get yourself all worked up. Why don't you go through mommy's laundry again. She might have gotten some new socks for Christmas. You'll feel much better.
--
Keith

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Perhaps a few decades from now, your mental age will grow beyond that of a twelve year old adolescent little puke.
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sci.electronics.design, snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

Now Dimmie! Is that any way to be? What's the matter, did mommy give all her socks to the Salvation Army?
--
Keith

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Not sure where you're getting this "four notes" from. Any valve or combination of valves yields far more than four notes.
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wrote:

A simple bugle only has four easy to reach notes - good for "Taps" , Charge, Chow call, horse races, Reveille, fanfares, etc. Not much use for more complex music.
Each valve adds four notes and each combination of two or three valves adds four notes. Twenty four notes for three valves. Single valve bugle has 8 notes total - enough to play simple music
The human playing the horn can reach four easily resonant notes with one length of pipe. "My Dog Has Fleas." You can fudge that with two above and one or two below - but they do not have the same timbre or volume. Like a clarinet hitting C above high C - it can do it, but not many people can do it.
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Your original statement was that "the trumpet only has 4 notes per valve combination". You say you "played a trumpet" but you couldn't have ever developed any facility on it, otherwise you'd know that's just patently wrong.
Yes, it's true there are limited note choices with a given valve combination in the lower register but the harmonics get closer the higher you go. Add more valves and you're using a longer horn with more harmonics in the lower register. With a 1-2-3 combination I count 7 partials just in the first two octaves of low F# to F# on the top of the staff.
When you say "only 4 easily reachable" notes - I assume referring to the open horn - i.e. no valves - this may be true for a beginner who can't even get to G on top of the staff (which you need for "taps") or some old duffer who only takes it out of the case on Veteran's day or something but this isn't true for someone who's developed any kind of facility. Listen to even a good high school stage band and you'll hear higher notes that are plenty "solid".
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The University of Edinburgh made a set of artificial lips for experimenting with trombone design. It was two lengths of rubber tube with pressurised water in them. Increasing or decreasing the pressure changed the note. Air was blown through these lips to make the buzz
Someone got a PHd out of the project: http://www.era.lib.ed.ac.uk/handle/1842/1966
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And here is her entire doctoral thesis: http://www.era.lib.ed.ac.uk/bitstream/1842/1966/1/Bromage+S+thesis+07.pdf You can see the apparatus in various pictures within it.
I wonder how big Mikey's doctoral thesis is? Can we read it online?
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wrote:

Pretty damn cool document!
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Gordon Hudson wrote:

    The apparatus shown in Fig. 6.9 (p 118) should have to be fitted into the robot head. The complexity of the artificial lips ("artifical mouth") with its mechanical constraints seem to indicate that the mouthpiece would have to be attached to it rather than to the trumpet body. I noticed only a small orifice in the robot's face where the mouth should be. Thus, the rumpet body should be only one side of a compressed air "Quick-Disconnect".

    It downloaded readily for me in its entirety (except for the accompanying CD).
        Angelo Campanella
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On a sunny day (Sat, 22 Dec 2007 21:25:36 -0000) it happened "Gordon Hudson"

I have played trumpet once upon a time, but my ears did not get blue. I did almost pass out once however, as it took all oxygen from my head....
I waited until the end of the movie to see if it would take the trumpet down, so I could see the 'lips'. Unfortunately not. For the rest it is pretty good:-) And it likely does not spit so much as we do :-) Could add that as a feature though!

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