Mounting prototype circuit boards to steel chassis

I'm working on a small robot (about 20 cm squareish) and, lacking
better materials, I've made the chassis out of Simpson Strong Ties
(small sheets of steel from Home Depot, with regularly-spaced holes for
nails). I'm using perfboards to make my wire-wrapped prototype
circuits, and I'm trying to figure out how to mount the boards to the
chassis. Obviously there are bare wires and leads all over the bottom
of the board, so I'll need to mount the boards with suffcient space so
the chassis won't short my circuits. How do you mount your circuit
boards to your robot frames? Any ideas will help.
Thanks in advance!
- Adam
Reply to
Adam
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Plastic standoffs are available in various lengths, or you can use nylon machine screws and nuts, available at most hardware stores (look in the specialty hardware drawers, not the pre-packaged stuff). Plastic standoffs are pretty common from most any electronics catalog retailer like All Electronics.
-- Gordon
Adam wrote:
Reply to
Gordon McComb
I haven't used "real" standoffs for years, since I started using those expanding sleeves for putting screws in concrete. The ones I'm talking about are just an extruded tube with ridges running lengthwise on the inside and outside. They should be available in different diameters and can be cut to length easily. Usable either with a long screw going all the way through, or two short screws in either end. Not every hardware store may have the same style of expansion sleeves though.
Reply to
cbm5
Just "make" stand offs, by using longer screws, and bolts between the PCB, and the chassis.
Like this
[=] -
Reply to
S. Fox Polymenis
A screw goes into material without a nut. A bolt goes through a hole and is fastened by using a nut. A nut threads onto a bolt.
Reply to
cbm5
So the same object is a "screw" or a "bolt" depending on whether you put it in a tapped hole or put a nut on it?
Reply to
J. Clarke
Technically "bolts" are fasteners that conform to a certain sizing standard, but these days most manufacturers follow a size threshhold for calling things bolts or screws (assuming a nut is attached to either one). Bolts under maybe 1/4" are referred to as machine screws. I guess it seems a little silly to call some miniature 2-56 threaded fastener a "bolt." It's a bolt to a flea, I guess.
You would use a "bolt" to attach the valve cover onto the block of your car engine; the block is threaded and doesn't use nuts, per se, yet it's still a bolt. I don't think a self-threading fastener would ever be called a bolt. I've always seen them referred to as screws.
-- Gordon
Reply to
Gordon McComb
Probably not statndard terminology, but I call something a "screw" if you install it with a screwdriver and a "bolt" if you install it with a wrench.
Except an all wrench (hex key) counts as a screwdriver.
George
Reply to
George Weinberg
What's a nut?
JM
Reply to
John Mianowski
Well, it's threaded on the inside, that's for sure. But I'm really not sure how to phrase the definition to properly distinguish between a nut and some threaded metal block. A nut only has one threaded hole, through the center, but if you were to drill a hole through the center of a manhole cover and tap it with a 6-32 tap I'd doubt if anyone would call that a nut.
George
Reply to
George Weinberg
Ayup.
I don't understand it either, but that's what I've been told.
I've also been told that a "drill" is what normal people call a "drill bit" and the machine that rotates the drill is called a "hand drill" or a "drill press" or a "drilling machine".
Jargon is strange sometimes. -- D. jay Newman
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Reply to
D. Jay Newman
I think I'll go with this idea, because the idea of easy variable lengths really appeals to me. Thanks, everyone, for your input. I appreciate it.
- Adam
Reply to
Adam

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