Trash-Bot

On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 13:51:06 -0800, Nehmo wrote:


If you've got the bucks, just use a wheelchair undercarriage. Figure out how to interface an ordinary RC controller box, and you're done. ;-)
Good Luck! Rich
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Is your suggestion that his idea is stupid, or are you simply envious of American ingenuity? Americans have ALWAYS found more creative and productive ways of doing things; even if it means building robots to do simple tasks to save time. Your racist view of Americans and their culture is uneducated and unfounded. Yes, many American's are overweight. This is because most work 10 hour days, do not eat right, and only have one week of holiday a year. This leaves little time for taking care of oneself.
I think the author has a wonderful idea, and I hope he markets his idea and becomes a millionaire by selling the technologies that come out this. Maybe then, he could open a factory in your country, where you can work for him on an assembly line.
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I read that iRobot (www.irobot.com), makers of the Roomba line of robotic floor care products (which Pooh Bear will certainly eschew) is offering their platform as a base unit for robotic developers. It might be what you're looking for in that it's the perfect size for holding a trash can although I have no idea what the weight limitations would be. Others have discouraged you because of potential problems with pedestrians, theft, directional stability or traction in adverse weather conditions. These are the very same objections raised at the turn of the 20th century when automobiles were introduced. Given the 100+ year success of the automobile perhaps those objections are not insurmountable! I think your idea has merit particularly for the elderly or infirm and even for those just not wanting to dash out in the rain. While it clearly won't be suitable for every geograhic variation, or affordable for many initially, I think there are still many millions of homes that would comprise a market for the product.
From:Nehmo Sergheyev snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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Success in the eye of the beholder. "Potential problems with pedestrians" means tens of thousands dead every year in the U.S. I have no idea the worldwide toll. Yeah, cars are great. If you had any other product that killed as many people as cars do, it would be off the market in a heartbeat. Drive your fat American ass to McDonald's and honk at some of those pesky pedestrians along the way.
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Having a bad day Kell?
Good or bad, and I'm not judging which it is, automobiles have been a success from the standpoint of sales and marketing - the benchmark of commercial success, which is what an inventor would most likely be concerned with. I don't why you would think that I consider pedestrians to be "pesky" as I am often one myself or how you would know how fat my ass is (would you like a photo?) but beauty is, as you say, in the eyes of the beholder. While I don't eat at McDonalds, it too is a commercial success. McDonalds biggest growth area - as well as the automobile's for that matter - is in countries OTHER than the USA. This trend shows that the ROW seems to want to emulate the USA. BTW, I have a number of UK friends, all of whom fall into two categories; the ones who have emmigrated to the US and the ones that want to.
One has to wonder why anyone, other than a Usenet Troll, who is so adamantly opposed to an automation product concept like a robot would be lurking in an automation newsgroup.
From:kell snipped-for-privacy@billburg.com

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BruceR wrote:

I guess that the obesity it often causes can be considered a comnercial succes for the medical industry too !
Commercial success dosn't mean something's automatically *good* !
Graham
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I didn't claim that it does. The OP wants to invent something that will be commercially viable and useful to some segment of the population. Who are we to pass judgement on whether it's "good for you?"
BTW, McDonalds does not "cause obesity." PEOPLE overeating and making poor dietetic choices causes obesity. McDonalds never claimed to be a health food store!
From:Pooh Bear snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 14:26:20 +0000, Pooh Bear wrote:

Democracy's kinda like that - it doesn't matter how wrong you are, as long as you have a lot of company. ;-)
Cheers! Rich
--
"We have met the enemy and he is us." - Pogo Possum


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Pooh Bear wrote:

No, you bigoted euro-id10t. A lot of overweight people had medical problems first. This limits their physical activity. If you simply reduce the calories in the diet, your body thinks you are starving and will digest muscle tissue instead of fat. I had high blood pressure and circulation problems long before I put on any extra weight. I eat as little as I can, and walk as much as i can, but I still have a weight problem. If I eat any less than my prescribed diet I get quite ill and spend a lot of time in bed because I can no longer walk. Read a little about the problem instead of damming an entire nation.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Right, it all has to do with your health status. I consume an estimated 6,000 calories per day and remain on the lean side because I can metabolize that amount and the diet is basically sound nutritionally. If I ate less I would become lethargic and begin storing fat.
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"Michael A. Terrell" wrote:

So why is obesity so particularly evident in the USA ?
Graham
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<stuff snipped>

After our failed attempt to retake Cuba in the 60's, we embargoed the island and its sugar. Americans were switched to a diet high in "natural" sweeteners made from corn syrup. Some research is beginning to indicate it may not have been a one-to-one replacement for sugar. In fact, high-fructose corn syrup may act more like fat than sugar in the body:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A8003-2003Mar10?language=printer
[registration required :-( ]
Fair use snippet: "Fructose is a different story. It "appears to behave more like fat with respect to the hormones involved in body weight regulation," explains Peter Havel, associate professor of nutrition at the University of California, Davis. "Fructose doesn't stimulate insulin secretion. It doesn't increase leptin production or suppress production of ghrelin. That suggests that consuming a lot of fructose, like consuming too much fat, could contribute to weight gain." Whether it actually does do this is not known "because the studies have not been conducted," said Havel."
All of this stuff's long-term effects have never really been studied in any detail. Other studies implicate it in a process called "pancreatic burnout."
I'm willing to bet the public cost of consuming corn syrup will dwarf tobacco's. American kids eat it from birth.
-- Bobby G.
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Pooh Bear wrote:

You make it sound like everyone in the US os overweight.
I used to be on a 3300 to 3500 calorie a day diet. These days it ranges from 1500 to 1800 calories. Any less and I get so weak I can barely get out of bed. I made a mistake and listened to a VA doctor and TRIED to go on his prescribed 1100 calorie a day diet. It put me in bed for several weeks. I went back to the diet I had worked out for myself and started feeling better. I actually put on over 10 pounds while on the 1100 calorie diet, because I couldn't do anything and my body thought I was starving.
When I finally saw a VA dietitian she looked at my menus, with full details on calories, fat, vitamins and minerals. She looked them over and told me to add a half a glass of orange juice and not to change anything else. She asked where and how I came up with the diet. I told her that I had experimented with different foods to find what made me feel the best, and still met the other requirements. A lot of my favorite foods are now only eaten on one of the two meals a month that I allow myself to eat what I want, and not watch the portions so closely. If I overdo it one one of those meals I can't eat breakfast the next day, and sometimes lunch before I feel hungry. When that happens I eat just enough to take my medication for diabetes and high blood pressure. You can't take them without food in the stomach.
BTW, I have been on International Drive in Orlando quite a few times and from what I saw, we are not the only ones with weight problems. It is an area full of discount and factory outlet stores where there are a lot more foreign tourists than locals. From what I saw, I think that the tour bus company and car rental agencies should have charged them by the pound. It was kind of funny watching someone jabbering in a foreign language while they had a half dozen cameras bouncing off their big gut.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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It's not. This is a myth created by the CDC. Not an intentional myth, but an overhyping of research data which were found to be faulty. Using the CDC criterion Will Smith fit into the Obese category. An overzealous press trumpeted the story for a couple of months, and when the story became old the mistake was uncovered, only by then nobody was interested and the press didn't want to lose face. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,113975,00.html (yes, I know not everyone likes Fox news, but the facts are right about the CDC)
The U.S. media will point out any problem in the U.S. first, and this information is broadcast all over the world. CNN, Fox, etc. will tell you about the health of U.S. citizens, but they will only infrequently tell you of similar trends in Europe or anywhere else. Not too many months back it was in the UK and European press that weight gain was as much, if not moreso, a problem in Europe than the U.S. I know because I visit every year. Two trends: 1. The world as a whole is now richer than it ever has been. People are able to spend more money on anything including food. Snack foods and treats were rare when I was young, and just weren't as available as they are now. 2. People are living longer due to new medical and drug treatments. The CDC and the WHO along with researchers the world over conquer problem after problem, until the #1 impediment to good health is now seen(or at least was for a couple of months) as bad diet and lack of excersize(spellcheck?). This is only the next domino to knock down, and so it gets the press. I wonder what the #1 cause of death will be when the average lifespan is 85?
Now, don't believe everything you read, and don't throw around the latest disinformation in a defamitory way just because you can't bother to look up the facts.
Brent S.
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wrote:
[snip]

[snip]
Old age ?:-)
My father is 87 and I see signs that his body is simply wearing out :-(
...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, P.E. | mens |
| Analog Innovations, Inc. | et |
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 17:59:46 +0000, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

What you need is therapy to release your self-hatred, just like Jim T.
Good Luck! Rich
for further information, please visit http://www.godchannel.com
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I want to do something similiar. But I wanted the bot to leave it at the curb. And getting the can off itself and onto the curb seemed too hard. I planned on making the robot big enough so the can rides in the center and the bot could lift and lower it into place. It could also bring multiple cans to the curb, one at a time. (And I wouldn't have to worry about someone walking away with it either.)
Also, it has to be waterproof. There's nothing worse than dragging your garbage cans to the curb in the pouring rain.
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Don't bother. Just automate the can or a carrier. The downside, of course, would be getting the trash guys to leave the damned thing upright so it could return to storage. Somehow robotwars comes to mind with automatic righting devices.
I don't think it'd be all that good an idea to attach the motor/carrier directly to a can. The way they smack around the cans would wreak havoc on any sort of motorized assembly.
Better to leave the cans separate and try to find ways to encourage them being put back into the carrier. If you're dealing with being disabled it might be reasonable to ask the guys on the truck and/or the dispatch office to help a little more than usual. No guarantees, of course, and not all areas have cooperative personnel. But it'd be worth asking.
-Bill Kearney
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Since trash cans are ususally tapered a carrier with basketball hoop style rings would only allow the cans to be placed upright.
From:Bill Kearney snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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Bill Kearney wrote:

I don't think it's that hard. Put it on a flat bed small wheel slow moving bot. When the bot gets to position, a jack screw raises one end of the bed, creating a ramp. A push arm slides the can(s) to the ground. The bot goes back to it's loaction at the house, leaving teh cans behind. When empty, the disabled person has a better ability to bring them back him/herself. Alternatively, the bot and the person both go to the empty can, the person loads it on the bot, and the bot rolls it back. Obviously the degree/ type of disability could prevent the problem. But for those who just can't carry a loaded can, some form of mechanized aid similar to what's being discussed may be practical.
What I don't see as viable is leaving the bot "out there" for thieves/vandals enjoyment.
Ed
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