Question on Sheet Metal Capabilities

I know there are numerous Users here skilled at the Sheet Metal portion of Solidworks. I have a general question that I would like to have answered before I
go through all the motions of attempting to model the object that I will be attempting, and it doesn't quite work. Do the sheet metal capabilities include the object being able to have a bend in it? To clarify this, picture a 3" diameter pipe, with a 1/8" wall thickness being bent around something the diameter of a telephone pole, add a single seam down the inner middle of this pipe so that it could be opened and flattened out. Can this be made in Solidworks Sheet Metal? Of course my other alternative would be to extrude a 3" cylinder, bend it to the radius that I need using the flex tool, then shelling it out to a wall thickness. I would much rather do it in Sheet Metal if at all possible so that I can offer the flattened out model as the blank that would be needed to fabricate the part. If the above procedure is possible, I would appreciate a quick synopsis of the method. I am thanking all of you skilled Ladies and Gentlemen in advance. Amy
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You might try creating this part as a lofted bend. I had to do a tube with an elliptical cross-section with one end cut perpendicular to the axis and the other at a 6 degree angle. It worked fine. I won't guarantee that this method would work, but it might. If it doesn't, you might try your VAR to see if any of the CSWP's there can help you do it.
Bruce B.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Maybe I misunderstood exactly what you were asking. If you only want to create a part like this and don't really need a flat pattern, you could do it with a sweep.
I looked in a steel book and found that you can get 3.00" OD round carbon steel mechanical tubing with a .125" wall thickness.
Hope this is of some help.
Bruce B.
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It would appear that I wasn't very clear with my question. I do know that there are several ways that I would be able to model this part. My question is: Can an object with a bend in it be made in the Sheet Metal mode? I really would rather do it using Sheet Metal if at all possible, because if I could supply my clilent with a flattened part that he could use for a template to use for his blanking tool, (used in production), this would be a plus for me. My instincts tell me that it must be difficult to flatten a part that has a bend in it because of the kinks that would occur. I am hoping that someone with more knowlege of Sheet Metal modeling than I have can answer this question, as much as I am hoping that Solidworks has found a way around this potential kinking problem.
Amy
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Hi there, I think if at all possible you would end up with a rectangular sheet, because you would flatten all the bends out. Regards, David
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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The sheet metal function can only handle simple bends, i.e. about a single bend line. What you are describing involves plastic deformation in multiple directions.
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wrote:

Thank you all. Multiple radii involves material shrinkage, stretching, etc., I was afraid that Solidworks would not be able to handle that. I suppose the only way to do the job would be to supplement the radius with an angle, and cut out a wedge shape triangle on the blank, to the same included angle so that when it is bent, the two edges of the blank would close to form a straight seam. Thanks for your response. Amy Labritto
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That's the same as asking why Muslim fanatics are Muslims, isn't it?
wrote:

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