Running SolidWorks using VNC

We are currently investigating the best strategy to work offsite on
SolidWorks documents.
Affordable internet connections here in AU are typically too slow to
move large amounts of data down and up the pipe.
Has anyone used VNC (or similar PCAnywhere etc) to run SolidWorks over
the internet or can offer other methods to work productively with
512/512Mb or 1500/256MB connections.
Thanks
DS
Reply to
D. Short
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I would think that running SW across any kind of slow connection would be painful. I know I am not giving you any kind of answer, but I have been doing conversions from Catia and am really fed up with everything else moving at a snail's pace because of the conversion process taking all the CPU time. I would think that running SW remotely would be like that.
WT
Reply to
Wayne Tiffany
"D. Short" a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
To clear things up you could first try it over your local network. I recall of a slight response time. IMHO usable for a few minutes, not much more. The other thing is the number of colors that decrease to 256 (?). Not sure if there is a setting for that.
HIH JM
Reply to
Jean Marc BRUN
TightVNC
formatting link
works fine with SolidWorks (2004 & 2005) over my local network (100base). Haven't tried remotely over the internet but documentation says it can do it.
Good luck,
Kent
Reply to
KCS Company
Ultr@VNC should be faster than TightVNC...
Reply to
Markku Lehtola
When I was giving SW training I used it in the classroom. It worked well there on a 100baseT setup. Using it over the internet requires a secure hook up.
Reply to
P.
VNC is not the answer.
Just install SolidWorks on the offsite system and use a VPN to get the license and files.
Reply to
RageX
I think he has a bandwidth problem. Broadband is roughly equivalent to 10bT. SW will easily max a 100bT network for short periods. He has considerably less bandwidth than Broadband would afford. So yes, he might be able to use VPN, but no, it wouldn't be practical from a speed standpoint. VNC uses little bandwidth and keeps the license at one place, local.
RageX wrote:
Reply to
P.
Thanks fuys for the info...
The bandwidth is the problem. We would be running at either 512x512K or 1500x256K, and of course through a vpn.
I have tried running VNC over the LAN and it ran fine at 100bt. I think that running local and getting the files over the WAN would be painful.
I am trying to test it here at home over a wireless LAN (802.11g), but my router seems to be blocking vnc somehow and I haven't got around that yet, but will soon. That will give me an idea of how it will run at about half speed to a 100bt.
Persistence.....
DS
Reply to
D Short
Thanks fuys for the info...
The bandwidth is the problem. We would be running at either 512x512K or 1500x256K, and of course through a vpn.
I have tried running VNC over the LAN and it ran fine at 100bt. I think that running local and getting the files over the WAN would be painful.
I am trying to test it here at home over a wireless LAN (802.11g), but my router seems to be blocking vnc somehow and I haven't got around that yet, but will soon. That will give me an idea of how it will run at about half speed to a 100bt.
Persistence.....
DS
Reply to
David
Well, if this all works how I am hoping, we would be using VNC (or ultr@vnc, or tightvnc, or pcanywhere or something.something) through a secure VPN tunnel.
It works almost perfectly over our 100Bt lan....
I have yet to be able to test what type of lag/response time we will experience with a 512x512 or 1500x256 dsl connection. That is main issue we are facing.
Regards DS
Reply to
D. Short
You don't need a VPN to run securely either. VNC can be run through puTTY with a secure shell (SSH).
D. Short wrote:
Reply to
P.
I've used it through normal VNC. It's ok to do some basic stuff, but it stinks to do any "real work" with it. Unless you are on a 100/mg lan, you can't follow your normal cursor - you have to go by the VNC cursor (which isn't too bad).. Rotating parts can stink, as the redraw can be slow on the screen.. If the pipe is too slow to simply transfer a solidworks part file, then I think it will definitely be too slow to use VNC in real-time.
I have also done this through my 10meg wireless broadband service (10meg up/down, low latency), and I can review and show off 3d models, but I wouldn't want to do any real work over it.
Reply to
Tom L

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