aluminum to steel

Aluminum shift knob (that I like) with a crappy plastic shim so it fits generic shift levers. The plastic is not holding up, so I want to hit the hardware store for a nut that I can grind / shape to fit inside the shift knob. Any suggestions on joining the nut to the inside of the knob so that it stays put? I figured an epoxy will work, any other suggestions? Any favorable epoxies to look for?

Reply to
Rusted
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I tried this stuff someone mentioned here earlier. (JB Weld epoxy should do just fine if what I mention next is out of the question). (The two part mix putty) I just jot a few pounds of HTS-2000 Alum. filler rod and I tried it today with a MAPP torch and it was incredible, I forget who posted a thread about it but it really works, I made three repairs that had me perplexed and if there was a better way to say it's "Snake-Oil" that really does work, this stuff does. I am a believer in it now. I had a chute release arm with a broken tab where the Morse cable attached and I made a copper dam to fit the missing part, drilled and machined it in and it is solid as a rock. It's base material is 3/8" thick billet alum. I'd try the HTS if you have no objection to throwing some heat at the knob and tapping out the end result (heat it up, while its still pliable and fluid stuff in a bolt with the same thread and once it cools, unscrew the bolt, run a tap through to clean it up and off you go). it's going to be way better than a epoxy for sure.

Respects,

Rob Fraser

Reply to
RDF

JB Weld.

That stuff is liquid duct-tape.

If it can't be fixed with Duct tape or JB Weld, you didn't really want to fix it :)

--- Rich

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Reply to
Rich Lockyer

Rob,

Would this be suitable for my case? "Crack in Aluminium Crankcase" - A couple of posts up?

Thanks

Reply to
Balders

Sounds like someone has been watchng he Discovery Heath channel.

Seriously though, is the bond good enough to trust in the chamber or are you taling about repairs on the head elsewhere?

As for the crankcase, why not just use OA, flux and 4043 rods?

Reply to
cl

I don't even get the channel smart-ass. If you need to be critical keep it to yourself. I'm trying to help the guy out. I do this for a living. so you go enjoy your TV show and fuck off.

Rob

Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA. ( Soon!)

Reply to
RDF

I think someone read the post wrong.

Reply to
cl

I think I was being an ass., Sorry. I thought I was getting penned as a "Home Shopping Network spaz" Not the case and sorry I jumped on you.. I don't handle stuff like that well when my best intentions are cut short. Truly sorry- As far as the rest of the post that I failed to read (I got cranky before finishing reading the entire post) I'll add what I'm about to do tonight to explain the combustion chamber issue and litmus test. The Rods you mention would work fine I bet. This is just a new product with some voodoo worth a shot. 4043 would take a lot more heat to melt down to puddle. I would be afraid of distortion only. The lower melting point on the 2000 seems a safer route. I don't know if the physical composition of the material is altered once it is removed from its base form or if heat releases or creates an exothermic reaction that flushes out the material that lets the deposit hold at a lower temp. A metallurgist or one of our experts need to chime in to answer this part. I am not qualified to answer, It just works (so far)

Respects,

Rob

Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, Ca. ( Soon!)

ATT>

Rick, Thanks for the link. I have a few rods of A3 I was given, this is the same theory and application method. I had good luck with the A3 but it cracked under stress on a distributor hold-down from a casting from one of my Top-Fuel cars dual Mallory Pro-mag's and the other night I dusted off the entire mag and fixed it with this new stuff. It's really the cat's keester. I'm going to rework a bad Brodix Track2 with a split between combustion chambers and I plan on running it until the engine lets go for a few other reasons. I really am interested in how the heads look post-mortem after a full throttle and "launch" emulation set of runs on the Eddy Current Dyno. I'm going to sent the results to HTS and Brodix for their use as well. This is going to be a hot- burner on pure Alky. The thing I don't understand is how I can "fix" the heads combustion chamber with a material that has a

500degree lower melting point than the base Al. So this is gonna really interest me. They claim GTAW won't fix the head (Brodix) but the HTS shows a MAPP heated repair that does(?) I'll let you know the results and photo and video the stuff as well. (Yup, plenty of fire ext. and we plan on wearing our drivers suits for this one.....) This will go really bad, or really good. Knowing we are going to destroy an engine for failure analysis is always a risky task but if it leads us to a better mousetrap it's worth it. Now one last thing on the A3- the problem was not with the material, we were confident it was the extreme vibration and insanely abrupt pressures from the throttles opening that overloaded the repair. For a static repair the A3 is great stuff.

Take care and I'll fill you in on the head work.

Rob

Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, Ca. ( Soon!)

Reply to
RDF

No problem at, I just wanted you to know my intentions were benign.

As for the chamber, I'm curious to your findings. Especially after a long series of heat cycles.

Reply to
cl

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