anyone weld bandsaw blades?

what is the technique..have tig equipment..what type of rod,preheat, etc..?
Reply to
zac
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You might want to look up the April 18th, 2004 thread here entitled "bandsaw blades".
Use Google groups search.
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The above must all be on the same line to work.
Several ways (including TIG) are discussed.
Jeff Dantzler
Reply to
Jeff Dantzler
Have repaired broken bandsaw blades and made new ones from bulk stock , best way I have found over the years is to join them with silver solder , I make up a hold down fixture from bar stock with the back or non teeth edge of blade against the bar and some relief near the joint, grind a scarf or taper on the flat of the two ends so they mate in the fixture, clamp both ends and make sure the blade is flat, brush the flux on the joint and bring it up to silver melting point, don't overheat, add silver, let cool and grind flush, keep grind lines parallel with blade , Good Luck. Phil Lohiser
Reply to
Phil
Hi Phil, This question seems to come up quite often. If you've got some pictures and an explanation, I can post this on WeldingFaq.com so folks can refer to it from time to time.
Larry
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'Web Guy & Hobbyist Welder'
Reply to
Larry
Bandsaw blade blade welder is easiest way to weld bandsaw blades.Even made in china blade wleder is expensive. Here is a web page selling a bandsaw blade welder powered by 12V battery.
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Should be easy to make your own copy.
Reply to
R. Duncan
Very interesting indeed.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
(clip) Here is a web page selling a bandsaw blade welder powered by 12V battery.(clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^ Why do you suppose they require you to observe polarity on the battery cables?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Probably because the company buys the cables. I would suppose that whomever makes the cables doesn't have much of a demand for two blacks or two reds on one cable.
Shawn
Reply to
Shawn
Maybe there is some electronic stuff in there - just not a starter solenoid. Could be a switcher for a high voltage spike to get things rolling.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
"Shawn" wrote: (clip) Probably because the company buys the cables. (clip) "Martin H. Eastburn" wrote: (clip) Maybe there is some electronic stuff in there(clip) ^^^^^^^^^^ If Shawn is right, the the OP ought to be able to build such a welder without too much difficulty. If Martin is right, then it may become a little more complicated.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
I suggest that a Ford auto type of starter coil that is controlled by 12 V and then witches the high current - use battery charger or larger wire inside... Use lugs or make one out of thick soft copper.
I figure if a starter coil on the side panel will start a 1955 Ford when it is cold - It should melt and weld the ends.
The coil keeps the requirement of 100 amps or so off the push button. Ok - you don't have to use a FORD one - but Chevy IIRC, put them inside the starter... Maybe a John Deer :-) I bet a farmer thought of it 50 years ago anyway... :-)
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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