Braze teminology question?

Fillet is the term for the braze alloy structure formed in a fillet joint or fillet weld. Is there a term for the braze alloy in a butt
braze? Butt?
Thanks, Tom
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Butt Crack Fill?
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ The term "fillet" refers to a rounded corner. I think "butt crack" is a plumbing term. <G>
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wrote: Butt Crack Fill?

I think it's an Aviation term:
http://www.weldingfaq.com/HeloCracks.JPG
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Butt, Tee, Corner, and Lap are types of joints. Fillet refers to the weld or in your case the shape of the brazing alloy in the corner of your Tee or Lap joint. The two most common welds are groove and fillet. A brazed Butt joint would infer that the joining faces are bonded by the capillary action in the joint. You are mixing joints with types of welds or in your case brazing deposits. I am sure AWS or similar code has resolved this more specifically. Randy
Fillet is the term for the braze alloy structure formed in a fillet joint or fillet weld. Is there a term for the braze alloy in a butt braze? Butt?
Thanks, Tom
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Thanks to all
Background: the application is brazing carbide to saw blades. I was teaching about the importance of adding fillets to what is essentially a butt joint. One person said that he thought the material between the steel body and the carbide tip was the fillet since fillet means something flat. I told him he was correct about the definition of fillet meaning flat but in brazing (which is governed by the AWS) fillet referred the shoulders of the joint. He said "O.K. then what is the braze alloy between the carbide and the steel called?".
Since the best joint in this application is a combination of butt and fillet I would like two separate terms to describe the two separate sections of the braze alloy.
E.G. the fillet should be roughly a right triangle. The distance on the flow onto the steel plate should be roughly the same as the distance of the flow on the exposed carbide which creates the side clearance on the saw blade. There should be some wetting onto the plate to indicate plate cleanliness. The braze alloy between the steel and the carbide (called ?) should be about 0.003" to 0.005" thick.
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I guess if you were to show a weld symbol for the joint you describe it would have TB for torch braze in the tail or if it was induction heated then some other abbreviation. The joint symbol would be a combination with the two parallel lines to show a square butt joint with applicable notations to show gap ( .003 to .005) and depth of penetration. Added to the parallel lines further away from the information line would be the typical triangular symbol indicating the fillet with the appropriate size notation. This kind of stacked symbol is quite common in procedures where one is welding thick sections. I don't see why this practice of stacking symbols would not work in your case and it would more accurately describe the required deposit. Randy
Thanks to all
Background: the application is brazing carbide to saw blades. I was teaching about the importance of adding fillets to what is essentially a butt joint. One person said that he thought the material between the steel body and the carbide tip was the fillet since fillet means something flat. I told him he was correct about the definition of fillet meaning flat but in brazing (which is governed by the AWS) fillet referred the shoulders of the joint. He said "O.K. then what is the braze alloy between the carbide and the steel called?".
Since the best joint in this application is a combination of butt and fillet I would like two separate terms to describe the two separate sections of the braze alloy.
E.G. the fillet should be roughly a right triangle. The distance on the flow onto the steel plate should be roughly the same as the distance of the flow on the exposed carbide which creates the side clearance on the saw blade. There should be some wetting onto the plate to indicate plate cleanliness. The braze alloy between the steel and the carbide (called ?) should be about 0.003" to 0.005" thick.
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