buckles in plate

i allowed my 12 year old son (a damn fine welder) to weld a sheet of 4x8x.125" checker plate to a frame of the same size using a millermatic 210.
i wanted a continual bead and explained to him the importance of multiple tacks on both sides to prevent buckling and i left to an appointment. the welding is excellent but he didnt follow my instructions closely enough on tack spacking/sequence and now im left with a plate with large buckles, .5" off the frame work in some spots. im seeking recommendations on how to smooth the plate to the frame work. im hoping this can be done without having to grind the entire plate off the frame. i thought about strapping some channel iron down across the plate and then heating the plate with a torch to relieve the stress but i welcome other suggestions. thanks,
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Nathan W. Collier
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When you buckle such thin material is can be a big problem. I would never seal weld 1/8th plate. The only solution I can see is to carefully remove the plate with a cutting disc. The perimeter of the plate will be shrunk and the only way to stretch it is to peen the edge on a heavy plate or anvil. It goes without saying that the checker pattern will be damaged for that half inch or so at the edge. I would not advise heat because you would have to heat multiple areas in the center of the plate to create shrinkage stresses equal to the stresses on the edge of the plate. The salvaged plate would easily be flattened if you were willing to trim half an inch off the edges that were welded. You have to have a plate shear plus be willing to accept an undersize plate. Is the angle frame under strong enough that you could add additional cross pieces and then pull the plate down to the angle with dogs and wedges? My little distortion problem I posted earlier came out sweet. We ended up with a panel that is nice and flat.
http://metalworking.com/DropBox/panelwelded.jpg
We could have been looking at a whole day with torches, porta-powers and wide flange beams to straighten the thing. Randy

210.
.5"
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Supervision is the answer.
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supervision would have prevented the issue, but since its over and done with it is not the answer to the question at hand. c'mon steve, i thought we got past our "issues"?
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with
got
Cut the plate off by any means you have available. Flatten it if possible without marring it or destroying it. If this is not possible, buy a new piece of plate. Redo the job, paying attention to clamping, intermittent staggered welds, and plug welding the interior from the center out prior to welding the perimiter. That is what I would do at this stage.
What issues?
Steve
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thanks for the tips steve. it really wasnt as bad as i had originally believed. when i lowered the welding machine onto the plate it mashed it about as flat as i could ever want it.
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Nathan W. Collier
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Ding Ding!

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thanks for the tips randy.
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Know what a hammer is?

210.
.5"
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