Making an outside wood burning furnace

Guy at work is constantly talking about this now that its getting
cold and I had the idea that the place to find someone who had done
this was people with the skills to do it. What would be the point of
asking office people for example how to do anything. We have acess to
steel sheet from 12 ga to 3/8 thick.
He can get slabs from his brother-in-laws sawmill and wants to run
hot water from the outside furnace into the house. Then use radiators
to warm up the place. I know that there is more to doing it than just
a box to get it very efficient and thought he should find a book on
how wood stoves are constructed. Anyone here with any experience at
this or wood stove construction? I think I remember that if you use
steel plate that it won't last as long as cast iron for some
reason. ??
Rosce
Reply to
Butter
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This is the best design I have seen. Will require skill to fabricate successfully. Good luck.
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Reply to
aviweld
I know that there is more to doing it than just
Richard Hill at the University of Maine published a pamphlet entitled " Design, Construction, and Perfromance of a stick-wood Fired Furnace for Residential and Small Commercial Applications" in 1979. He used castable refractory for the wood burning part and a steel boiler ( not a pressure boiler ). So try googling on " Richard Hill university maine furnance ".
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Someone at "alt.energy.homepower" may know.
Reply to
Johns Yard
Search for Mother Earth News There were articles there at one time.
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Butter wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Is this it?
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Dan in Wyoming
Reply to
Dan R.
This sounds just like what he keeps talking about. Thanks a big bunch y'all Rosco
Reply to
Butter

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