OA Goggles


Ok... I have had half a dozen pairs of OA goggles over the years. Since I
don't use my torch a lot whenever I reach over to grab my goggles the
elastic in the strap is totally worthless and the plastic base that meets
the face is all distorted from heat, hanging, etc. I wind up using my old
glass safety/sunglasses to get the job done. Not the best solution.
Wadda ya do?

Reply to
Bob La Londe
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I have a standard headband and grinding shield fitted with a #5 filter. Works really nice with bi or trifocals. Lots of peripheral vision, easy to flip up to check your work. You still need to wear safety glasses to deal with the spatter though.
Bob La L> Ok... I have had half a dozen pairs of OA goggles over the years. Since
Reply to
RoyJ
You can get generic safety glasses in shade 5 - and they are usually large enough that you can wear corrective lenses under them if you need the magnification.
Works like a charm.
Also the suggestion of a full face shield in shade 5 (or whatever you need) is a good one. We have one but I gravitate toward using the tinted safety glasses as they are more convenient.
Carla
Democracy cannot work. Mathematicians, peasants, and animals, that's all there is - so democracy, a theory based on the assumption that mathematicians and peasants are equal, can never work. Wisdom is not additive; its maximum is that of the wisest man in a given group. Robert A. Heinlein
Reply to
Carla Fong
I wore the Uvex safety glasses for years. Even liked them for motorcycle riding. That would be cool. I have a couple grinding shields. Probably due for some new ones.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
What he said. Goggles fog up on me.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I used to buy Uvex Patriot #5's. They were cool looking, being red, white, and blue, then became very collectible when the company quit making them. Don't know if they started again, but the Uvex are great, and you can buy the one piece lens. They wrap around, giving decent eye protection. If I was doing overhead or lots of spatter, I'd wear a face shield, too.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Just buy the #5 filter ($8 ??) for one of your existing shields, see if it works for you. If you like it, buy a new head band.
Reply to
RoyJ
I bought a replacement elastic band at the local welding shop. Years later I opened it up and there were three elastic bands instead of one. I think the cost was basically insignificant.
I know kind of what you mean I have ones which have the standard welding shade like fits in an arc welding helmet. one is in rubber like, one is in rubber like and has a flip up feature (heavy to the front)and one is made of the material arc welding helmets are made of and uses springs and a bent wire behind the head. This one doesn't have the issues discussed above. Then we have the ones with two round shades some separate and some attached to molded rubber like the previous. I have more than a dozen shades and clear covers for holder which might resemble ski mask but nothing to install them in.
For cutting I generally use a full face shield like for arc welding. If the rubber ones are kind of distorted and not too old you can distort them the other way and let them set. I have been getting real bold with the coated bronze brazing rods and not using anything but glasses from the eye doctor.
I never use standard safety goggles or sun glasses type. It depends on how scared of a pop and splatter what to do. If you walk into things with headgear on that might factor in as well.
Fran
Reply to
fran...123
Why is it that we use those face shields far beyond their life span when they get so hard to look through because of burns and scratching? Then when you put on a new one, it's "Why didn't I do this a year ago?" Plus, we usually have three new ones in a drawer. Somewhere.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Same reason we try to squeak a couple more months on those bald tires even though we know the wet/snowy season is coming up. Or to get another couple months on a 48 month/$50 battery (think $1 per month cost!) and wind up needing a tow from some god forsaken back road.
Whenever I have a critical welding project, I pop a new face plate in the helmet, clean the lens squeaky clean, and clean the glasses. Does wonders for the quality of the work.
Reply to
RoyJ
"RoyJ" wrote
Have you ever tried a gold lens? The first time I used it, it was amazing, just like the first time I used an autodark. I like them, but they are spendy. Maybe like you say, just for critical projects. There's just something about them that I really like. I wouldn't use them for every day use unless I was doing x ray welds, tho.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I have two auto darkening shields now. They have improved my UBS welds both in quality and appearance.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
For really critical stuff I tend to go with really clean and one shade lighter than usual. Once I get past the critical spot, I go back to the usual shade. Suppose I should try a gold lens, just haven't done enough welding lately to make much difference.
I keep getting interrupted with things like: I spent the AM working out some sort of safety policy to deal with someone wanting to build a reaction chamber for decomposing 50% H2O2 without taking out the side of the building.
Steve B wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I have used a gold foil covered plastic welding lens for most of my life and much prefer them for several reasons. I normally weld outdoors and use a shade 9 in my mask plus safety sunglasses for most work, but will change to a darker shade for special high current work. I like that the gold foil plastic lens is a lot lighter weight which is a lot easier on my neck, and also that the lens does not break if I drop my mask. I really like that they are very reflective which is nice when working in a dark or shaded area as they reflect the light from the arc back on the work area (if you hold your head in the right position, which takes a little practice).
The gold foil is easily damaged and must be discarded if scratched or damaged in any way. I place a clear plastic cover plate in front and behind the gold plate in the flip holder and another clear plate in the fixed mask for protection when grinding. I use a spacer between the foil and the front clear lens but not on the rear as the foil lens has a lip which maintains enough space but I like a spacer in front to ensure that the front plate never touches the foil.
A great deal or care is required when cleaning as the foil is easily scratched if wiped with any grit, (usually my shirt tail). I cycle a new clear lens from the fixed mask to the rear of the flip then to the front of the flip then discard.
The foil lens is more expensive but can last longer because they do not break when dropped. IMHO they are well worth the extra cost.
I do have an autodark but use it mainly for tacking or small short welds and use the standard mask for most heavy work as it is more comfortable and lighter and I suspect tougher. Old habits die hard.
Just my .02, YMMV
Reply to
Private
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Is this really adequate for OA cutting? Its seems to say it is.
Reply to
Bob La Londe

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