Russian welding process?


While web surfing I found a curious reference to a =93Russian welding=94
process:
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To wit: =93Metals can be welded together at high pressure without any
heat. The Russians are particularly good at this. They have one
simple device where the components to be welded are placed under a ram
full of water. In the north the water is frozen simply by opening the
door; it expands as it freezes & forces the components together at
20,000 atmospheres.=94
Probably this is not an economical process, but sounds interesting
anyways. The ram design must be massive to withstand all the forces
for any sizable part. (20,000 atmospheres =3D 300,000 psi) Obviously
it=92s a solid state welding process [like diffusion welding (DFW),
explosive welding (EXW), etc], but I=92ve not been able to find out
more.
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Could this be a Russian
state secret?
My google searches for =93high pressure welding=94 get cluttered by
results for welding processes for high pressure vessels, so I haven=92t
learned more. Anyone here heard of this process?
Reply to
Denis G.
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g=A0 Could this be a Russian
The tiny wires used in intergrated circuits are bonded using pressure. And the clad metal used for coins as quarters are bonded at very high pressure produced by explosions. I am not sure if Texas Instruments still does this, but read recently about a company with the stock symbol " Boom " that does this. Try seaching on diffusion welding.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Dont believe evrything you read in comic books.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
--Hmmm. Sounds like a refinement of explosive welding. There's a kewl book floating around called "High Energy Rate Forming" that explains the process. A pal of mine used to do this in his backyard in a residential neighborhood. Heh.
Reply to
steamer
g Could this be a Russian
The tiny wires used in intergrated circuits are bonded using pressure. And the clad metal used for coins as quarters are bonded at very high pressure produced by explosions. I am not sure if Texas Instruments still does this, but read recently about a company with the stock symbol " Boom " that does this. Try seaching on diffusion welding.
Dan
I had read a nice technical article on this when my wife used to work for Titanium Metals Corp. It was called "explosion bonding". I'd like to see it done once. They did whole sheets.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
A high voltage spark in liquid is also used to generate the shock wave.
Gunner
"Obama, raises taxes and kills babies. Sarah Palin - raises babies and kills taxes." Pyotr Flipivich
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Although it seems ironic, I=92ll probably have to follow the advice of Stupendous_Man and read my comics more skeptically. David Billington noted that an adjacent panel was suspect and indeed I found no connection between =93Theobald Wilson=94 and the discovery of acetylene. I did email Tim Hutchins (the engineer/author) to see if he could provide references for his claims, but have not received a response. I am sure that he=92s probably chortling at having fooled another idiot (myself) and he is probably mixing up new batches of fact and fiction for his strip. From reading the strip, I had the impression that the machine described moved a ram as the water in a cylinder froze and expanded. I did not think that they were describing =93explosive welding.=94 (I have seen a HERF (High Energy Rate Forming) machine in real life, but not while it was operating. It was at a company in Pittsburg and was 2-3 stories tall and went down through the floor (shock absorbers below). We saw a high speed video of an aluminum round being formed and you could see the shock waves as the aluminum deformed. Mostly they worked on refractory metals, but it was neat to see.)
What attracted me to the claims in the strip was that they seemed plausible and I=92ve provided some links I found from =93fact checking=94. (Those of you with better things to do should leave now and go do something useful.)
Welding history:
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(click on =93timeline=94 for dates =96 Russian inventors included) NASA paper on diffusion bonding::
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(with references to Russian experiments). High pressure & Russian industrial diamonds:
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pressure physics (Percy Williams Bridgman):
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the power of freezing ice: Physics of ice:
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the force of freezing water:
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harnessing the force of freezing ice (discussions, but nothing practical):
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Reply to
Denis G.
That's how they make those large steel domed covers. The electrodes look like a spark plug, except the tip is about 4" long.
Al
Reply to
Big Al
and of course, as NASA is plagued by, all you have to is sit one clean slab of metal on top of another in a vacuum and they will try to weld themselves.
Reply to
z
There do seem to be a lot of referernces to a T. L. Wilson, though; I didn't find any mention of him flinging the mess into a creek though.
Reply to
z

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