Tig filler metal for .04 electrode

The smallest diameter mild steel filler metal I can get from my local weldi
ng supplier is 1/16, but when I use a .04 tungsten electrode, I find it har
d to melt, and the bead is the classic "turkey droppings". Running about 65
amps; any higher burns through my work piece (again mild steel scrap).
I was told to get a 0.045 mig spool. I did, but it very hard to use due to
the coil. I cut off a small length, try to straighten by hand, but it is st
ill too crooked to accurately dab into puddle.
Is there an online supplier for 0.04 or 0.045 filler? Or is there a way to
straighten from a mig spool? Thanks for any advice.
Reply to
Bart K
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I had the same issue with Aluminum and .023 wire. After some practice, I can straighten short chunks (a foot or so) by hand. Also, look in the metalworking dropbox, I think Ernie Leimkuhler posted pictures of a MIG wire straightener for this task.
BobH
Reply to
BobH
A standard thing for this is to use locking wire pliers, see
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, to twist the wire which will straighten it. Clamp one end in a vice or similar and use the pliers to give it a couple of twists and it should end up straight. I expect a drill would do the same job if the chuck can grip the wire. I regularly use MIG as TIG filler but mainly for what I do just roughly straighten it by hand, I'll use my locking wire pliers if I need a longer straight length.
Reply to
David Billington
I think it may have been this one
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Reply to
David Billington
If you pull it to it's tensile limit, it will straighten. For .045 "70" wire that would require a pull of 115 lbs. My mind is racing with ideas about devices to do the pulling, but I won't spoil your fun.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
For small quantities of relatively short wires (say 2' in length) I made what amounts to a slide hammer. A piece of lead with a hole drilled in it with plenty of clearance. I then stick one end of the wire in the vice, slide the lead onto the wire and hole the other wire end with a vice grips. Slide the "hammer" against the vice grips and about the time the wire breaks at the vice grips end (it invariably does), the wire is pretty darn straight.
Reply to
Wally
Neat, easy, fast!
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
You kind-of get used to the wire being floppy and off-the-spool. Used 0.8mm (about 32thou) stainless filler wire from MIG spool for TIG'ing stainless at around 40A. You can have quite long length dangling and be OK - say 1.5m - will hang to floor (which must be super-clean!). Concentrate on your wire-feeding action - practice when not welding - visualise it as building up muscles you don't normally target in any other exercise.
I took a bit of movie on wirefeed.
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Gloves only off so you can see. Practice with TIG gloves on. Rich Smith
Reply to
Richard Smith
There is lots of 045 tig rod sold on ebay, both steel and stainless. Just search "tig rod 045". Another possible source of filler is 040 stainless safety wire which I have used in a pinch.
Reply to
RogerW
Use the MIG spool if it works.
Its pretty easy to straighten.
Spool out several feet and clamp it in a vise by the spool. Then grab the loose end with a pair of good ViseGrip pliers, and back away from the vise. Pull back on it until you feel it stretch slightly. Then clip the now straight section into workable size pieces.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I straighten some wire here at 3:37 in this video.
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Reply to
Bob La Londe

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