What kind of forge do you have?

Anyone own a NC Tools Whisper series forge? Pros/cons?
Other suggestions for a turnkey forge that is better?
I need it to be able to heat long rods in the middle for spiraling. Also
for just heating the ends and working.
Steve
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I have three.
I have a Johnson appliance propane forced air forge, a home made venturi propane forge and a home built coal forge.
I have seen a Whisper momma (I think that is what it was) in action and it worked quite well. Personally for the cash you could build a lot better forge and have money left over. But if you want to buy, that should easily handle the tasks you want to do.
Bob
wrote:

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My situation is that I need to just get up and producing. I know that I can build a forge, and have been reading about it for quite a while now. What I will be doing will pay for itself in a very short time, and I am becoming lazy in my old age. Years ago I would not have considered buying one, but today is different. My time is more valuable today, my obligations and responsibilities are more numerous, and my to do list is longer. For the time I would spend building one, I can make more money doing something else, or just go fishing.
Priorities, man.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

I have used a Whisper Momma and it works as advertised. Good piece of equipment.
Pro: Pushbutton ignition, quickly comes up to heat, produces quite adequate heat for forge welding, with the side openings option, it's easy to heat parts of long workpieces, UL etc, etc. listed which might make landlords, fire departments and such a little easier to get along with.
Con: Pricey, one must be careful not to tear the roof and side lining, requires 12-15 psi gas pressure for neutral atmosphere, which means higher fuel consumption. This can be cured by adding leaf chokes on each air bell to reduce air intake at lower gas pressures. I use mine most often at 5 psi for general forging.

Centaur Forge also carries the Mankel Knifemaker series and the Forgemaster brand but I haven't used either of those. IMHO, A better alternative is to check out www.flash.net/~dwwilson/forge/forgeplans.html or Ron Reil's site at http://www.reil1.net
I built a "Plan Two" forge with slight modifications using the dwwilson site. It works quite well. I substituted two .045 MIG gun tips for gas orifices. I used it that way for several years before I decided I needed something lighter to carry about to demos, etc.
When I retired it to shop-only use, I bored the MIG tips to .0625 and installed a blower. I have to periodically scrape the messed up kitty litter off the bottom now, but that's a minor nuisance. (flux absorber)
If you decide to home build, check with Jay Hayes at http:// snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Jay carries a full line of parts and supplies for building forges and he's good people.

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