Learning to draw in 3 dimensions

Could anyone recommend a book for teaching myself to draw in 3d? I do
residential architectural design only and am familiar with the basics of
extruding, etc. What is need is something a little more advanced and
specifically tailored to homes. I am currently using AutoCAD 2000. Thanks.
--Karen
Reply to
Karen
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Honestly, if you know the basics, why not draw an interior? That's what I did, a bathroom, and it's a bit tougher than modeling an exterior. When you can model a toilet, faucets, pedestal sink, sink stopper, etc, as well as walls, windows, etc., everything else looks easy. (Or, at least, as easy as it gets in Acad.)
The main trick in 3d in acad is UCS manipulation, I find.
Other tips:
use multiple viewports with different points of view, for clarity
learn how to use point filters
break the project into components for ease of modeling, and assemble them
check out my lisp page, there are some time savers there
DIVE IN!
Reply to
Michael Bulatovich
Karen I've been a CAD consultant for 20 years. I can give you reliable advice (which you haven't gotten so far) but I'd need more information. Do you exchange drawings with architects? Do you provide drawings for builders? Do you work directly with a client who wants a home designed and built? Are you getting into the realistic rendering? What?
Could anyone recommend a book for teaching myself to draw in 3d? I do
Reply to
clintonG
have to exchange drawings with various engineers though. What do you suggest"
Reply to
Karen
If they are your bread and butter I'd suggest you talk to the builders and engineers you exchange drawings with. There are all kinds of little gotchas exchanging drawings that can add up to a bunch of lost time and money simply because people do not communicate with one another. The other and perhaps most significant problem is blind support for a software vendor's product noting most vendors make it easier and more productive to exchange drawings created with their own products.
Since you're working with an older version of AutoCAD that Autoslime will not allow you to upgrade anymore you'll have to buy something all over again. Chief Architect Pro for example has worked out very well for residential design and drafting. You should also evaluate VisonRez which is built on top of AutoCAD. If you decide to buy back into Autodesk you should probably buy into Revit and then add rendering software like 3D Studio Viz.
Reply to
clintonG
I dont think clinton has come even remotely close to answering your question; 20yrs in the cad field hasnt taught him to 'capiche' a question. As for your comment regarding autoslimes 2000, I personally think it will do anything that karen wants it to do. (as for the 'autoslime' remark, I couldnt agree more...... they are only interested in selling selling selling.)
Reply to
behere
Karen,
Why don't use SketchUp to draw in 3d then export the views or model into Acad? SketchUp is avaible from Google. There is a free version and a pro version which allows additional plugins.
From use I can tell you SU offer the most value for the money. Even the free version is powerful enough and easy to use from the start. Exporting an elevation into Autocad is a breeze.
regards Steve
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Reply to
Steve

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