Pandrol E Clips Alloy composition

I've been forging chisels, etc from Pandrols for a while with good results, and I got to wondering what exactly the steel was. I Googled,
extensively, and got no answer. So, I just called the U.S. Pandrol office, and here's what I was told:
It's a proprietary alloy (of course), but basically a modified 5160, with perhaps a little more carbon.
I'm passing this on for those that may read it now, and for those that may Google in the future.
~D
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Cool! Good job, thanks. :)
Now, what's a Pandrol E Clip? :/
Alvin in AZ

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snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

Glad you asked, Al.
The pandrol clips are what fasten railroad rails these days; spikes are on the way out. Look for concrete sleepers (ties) and you'll find pandrol clips by walking the line. They look like real heavy paper clips...sorta...google is yer friend. Disclaimer: Please do not pull spikes nor remove pandrols! <G>
~D
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Are they painted yellow, kind of C chaped and split into two legs joined at one end? about 8 inches long when straightened? Been playing with some of these and I came to a comparison conclusion that they must be 5160.
Greyangel
wrote:

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Dave wrote:

Have you tried OCS (Old Chevy Spring)? Discarded auto/truck coil and leaf springs are pretty good stuff and dispite all the comments I've received re how bad it is to use old springs, I've yet to break a tool I made from them.
On coil springs, I cut of one or so rings and heat and straighten (hammer and anvil). Heat to "cherry red" and bury in ashes to anneal. Saw/machine/grind/file to required shape. Heat to cherry red and quench in oil. Clean to bare metal and gently heat to a brown (hard) or purple (not quite so hard but tougher) and quench again.
Never harden directly from forging. Heat to cherry, let air cool (normalize), re-heat, quench, temper.
After he broke his third Snap-on cold chisel, I made one out of truck-size coil spring for my mechanic son-in-law. This was several years ago. He says it may soon need to be sharpened.
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Ted Edwards wrote:

Oh, for sure. Chevrolet invented OCS specifically for a smooth ride, and to provide Smiths with good material. <G>
Massage it right, and that steel will make a wonderful tool.
I've found that there are many more acres of rail line than scrapyards. That's part of the reason of my post
My local scrapyard is tightening up on regs. Gasp, I cannot wear open toed shoes there anymore! Gone then, are the days of freewheeling barefoot metalhunts.
Tongue in cheek,
~D
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