Ping alvinj here's the blade pics for you

Hi Al, here is a few of the blades I've made, the pic was taken with a flash so the shadows are a bit harsh the small patch knife was made from a 6
inch Nicholson Black Diamond file, it's still file hard. The one with the brass guard is 1095 hardened and drawn to 62 Rockwell C. The one to the right is from A2, hardened and drawn to 63 Rockwell. Do you have any idea what the blade style would be called of the one on the right?
http://www.geocities.com/bearsbugbox/bearsblades.jpg
Bear
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Beautifull work! I love the A2 blade. Not that I'm all that informed but I would have called it a skinner or hunting knife.
GA

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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 18:12:56 -0700, "Greyangel"

I was trying to work out a blade that would do both of functions, field dressing and skinning well. Most store bought knives for hunting either work great for field dressing, but are not so good at skinning, or they are clumsy at field dressing but work real well at skinning. According to Mom and my brother Dan's best man in his wedding (Dan had me make one just about like Mom's for his best man, only difference was a brass lined lanyard hole in place of the end pin) it seems that I hit on the right mix.
Bear

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Very nice work, Bear. I was very impressed by yesterday's closeup of your Mom's knife. That blade could be either a small skinner or a (Chef's) boning knife, but you made it, you so you can call it anything you want :)
A2, good choice! Just make sure she doesn't let it soak in the sink or throw it in the dishwasher (that seems to happen here all the time grrrrrrrrr).
-- Bill H. [my "reply to" address is real] www.necka.net Molon Labe!
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boning
throw
Ha! When my wife and I first got together she had these terrible stainless kitchen knives and she treated them like butter knives - about as sharp too. I sharpend them up and tried to teach her how to respect a blade but it was her stuff and she was gonna do what she wanted. Cool. So I went out a got a couple good straight carbon steel blades and sharpened them up good and told her "these are mine - Respect them!" After 15 years I lost the battle for not allowing her to use them and I still find them rusting on a towel next to the dish drainer all the time. I did manage to convince her not to put them in the silverware drainer with the rest of the metal stuff. I console myself that I can put and edge on the carbon stuff quickly at least when they get dull.
GA
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Same here about "mom's knife". :)
Big ol' thread and I haven't got to see the new one yet. :/
Alvin in AZ
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 06:57:27 -0700, "Greyangel"

I do most of the cooking here so I wash, dry and put way my carbon steel knives as soon as I'm done using them. I got into that habit by the time I was 8 or 9 years old. My wife doesn't even touch my knives she has a set of her own. I freaked out on her shrotly after we first got together when I found her using my good boning knife for a screwdriver. I had to totally re grind the whole front end of it, and because the grinder that was used when it was made was a different dia. than any I had access to it ended up looking botched. It works fine but I think it looks like hell.
Bear
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They all look cool but I like the middle and left ones the best.

It looks coolest! :) If I were going to describe it, it looks like a "worn-out hunter". :) I make "worn-out paring knives" on purpose.
Are those "cuttler's rivet's" or pins?
I got away from cutler's rivets and went to "peened pins".

Imperial/Schrade called their's the "sharp finger". :) I've seen about 3 of them owned and used by others... yours being 63hrc A2 has got them whipped soooo bad. ;)
------ Back in my earliest days making knives and researching any information I could get, I talked to old farts that lived through the depression, they are all dead now but they all talked about a knife breaking instead of bending and staying bent. Later, when they'd ruin a knife by it staying bent they were pretty puzzled and disappointed that, that wasn't how it used to be. Edge holding was more important back then? Now it seems not having the knife break is more important. If it bends and stays bent... "you did it" if it breaks in two "it's the factory's fault" and they "get to" give you a new one for free... or something like that? :/
Your A2 knife is ever bit as strong as hardened 1095 and holds an edge better both.
I also read everything I could get my hands on about high carbon steel and tool steel... that took years and now find it more interesting than the knife making. :)
So, the Old-Timer (not Uncle Henry) "sharp finger" was soft-crap 1095. So was the Uncle Henry Golden Spike made by the same outfit.
They just went out of business after 100 years you might still be able to find pictures of them on the internet.
An ex-brother-in-law (she packed her shit and left me and the kids... yippeee!;) had a UH-Spike, cool looking knife blade and awfull handle but easy to take apart. :) Anyway he used it on a deer hunt and couldn't skin a deer with the dangged pry bar. :/
I hollow ground it pretty thin compared to what it was (.025"?)... still no good! :/ Re-heat treated it and drew it at 325F for an hour so it was pretty close to 64-65hrc. (didn't cold treat it) Da-dah! We have a winner! ;) I hollow ground it thinner still (.018"?) but it was mostly due to extra hardness that it would now -cut into stuff- before it was so soft it might as well been work hardened mild steel.
Why would a knife company make something like that on purpose? :/
Alvin in AZ
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2004 20:51:48 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

the idea I was working on when I made that was for gutting a deer, the "worn out" part when you have the blade in your hand upside down lifts the hide and more or less parts the hair from the inside of the animal to the outside and that way you end up cutting less hair and more hide. the report I got from Dad was that the blade part works well but that straight handle left something to be desired.

uh-oh, you asked a machinist about something he came up with himself
;o)
They are step nuts for lack of a better name, I took 3/8" dia brass rod stock and set up an old turret lathe to tap drill 1/4" deep, then tapped #12UNC fine 3/16" deep with a bottoming tap, then faced to 3/16" X 1/4" dia. shoulder and put a 1/32" X 45 degree champher on both sharp edges and cut them off at 1/2" long. I ran off about 2 dozen of them. then I set up a horizontal mill with a 0.50 thick slitting saw milling cutter over a vise with a "V" notch in the solid jaw and a block under the parts to make sure each was slotted the same 1/16" depth. To use them I step drill the handles with a 1/4" inner hole and flat bottomed counter drill 3/8"dia leaving 1/8" thick stock matching the 1/4" dia holes in the blade shank, then wash both handle scales (with blade end of scales already finished), a #12 fine thread 1/4' long for each hole in the blade and the blade in laquer thinner or MEK then I mix some 2 hour set epoxy and put a thin layer of epoxy onthe blade and inside surface of one of the scales, lube the holes in the scales with epoxy and press the nuts all the way in until they bottom, the 1/4" ends of the nuts should stick out 1/16" press the scale onto the blade and prepare the other scale the same way except before assembling roll a #12 fine thread X 1/4 long set screw for each hole and screw them into the nuts in the loose scale, once the screws contact the brass in the already mounted scale you have to screw the nuts together with a fairly heavy hand and a large screwdriver turning each screw 1 turn each at a time. after the are all the way tight clean up the epoxy that has oozed out and set aside for 24 hours. then finish the handle to your liking, to bring the outside ends flush with the handle scales use a 36 to a 60 grit new belt on a high speed belt grinder use very light pressure and work slowly stopping often to let the brass cool, if your handle scales are ebony like the one in the picture or any other exotic harwood in the same hardness range and keep your belt very sharp, in near new condition and keep your pressure light the wood and brass will be removed at very close to the same level, if the belt is dull or loaded the wood will be removed faster than the brass, if your pressure is too high and the belt is dull or loaded the brass heats up and the wood and epoxy start to smoke
A word of warning. If you are using almost any of the exotic hardwoods like cocobola, ebony, kingwood, african blackwood, lignum vitea, any rosewood and the like make sure you where a face mask of some kind, the resins in the dust from those woods is at least quite noxious, if not worse, it makes the inside of your nose feel like its on fire for a couple days if you breath in very much of it, and it comes on slow enough that by the time you notice it , it's already too late. I say this in hopes that maybe some one can learn from my mistake and spare himself a little pian and discomfort.

I saw one of those after I made the one in the picture, the Sharade one would be a nice knife for anyone with medium to small hands, but for some reason I really don't care all that much for plastic handles. Also handles with flat sides to me feel like they weren't quite done yet,, I don't know why,, they do work just as well as a contured one,,

I got started the same way, first from my Grandfather and after that any one I could find who had any knowlege they were willing to share,, that's why I keep my eye on this newsgroup too.

I got a real good introduction to that when I was in tech school, especially during the year I was studying Tool Enginering and Design" and got a whole lot more info on that from the Manufacturing Engineer/Metalugist at the place I use to work. I really miss that place.

1095 is a very versitile steel for a plain carbon steel, in the annealed state it is still tough as hell, at half hard it's a pretty dependable spring steel, and at near full hard it has very good edge holding ability,, it just needs to be heat treated right for what the piece at hand is meant to do.

I thought Old Timer was bought out by Sharade. I didn't know they were out of buisness completely.

I think you hit right on it earlier, they are more worried about the blade breaking than anything else, they know there are far too many idiots who will use a knife as a prybar, so they make springs instead of cutting tools, and unless you re-heat treat them a spring won't hold an edge very long.

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