Use for a broken bandsaw blade??

Greetings all
Whilst cleaning out yet another box/container marked "Stuff" I
found that I have two "bits" of 1 inch band saw blade, about a foot
and a half in length. Having seen videos on how to turn spade bits
into router irons, I have two questions:
1) "What was I thinking?"
2) what can be done with a piece of band saw blade? It is not
exactly stiff enough for use in plane, although it might work for a
knife blade.
Any ideas for "alternative" uses?
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
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You could probably fashion a blade for the end of your favorite "box cutter". Maybe it would last longer than the kind you buy 12 for $2. An envelope opener also comes to mind. Filet knives (for fish) have flexible blades. Good luck with your project! : )
Reply to
Bill
I have a knife my dad made out of 1 1/4 inch wide blade, it is 1/16 inch thick was from a LARGE metal cutting bandsaw. A marking tool is also a possibilty.
Reply to
Markem618
They work well as scraper blades for woodwork. Hone both sides and the edge to form *sharp* 90-degree edges, use a hard metal (shaft of a good screwdriver) to form a microscopic lip, and scrape. It cuts wood grain cleanly, rather than shredding it and filling it with dust like sandpaper does, and removes material faster than sandpaper too. Treat with a good Danish oil and you have a superb finish.
Clifford Heath
Reply to
Clifford Heath
pyotr filipivich snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I've thought about drilling holes in either end of a broken blade and just making it into a bow saw. I just never got around to it when I had a broken blade with still very sharp teeth.
A simple striking knife could be created by sandwiching the blade with two pieces of wood and grinding the profile to match. I wonder if the teeth would come off faster in a vise wiggling them back and forth with pliers or if you just ground them down. (Or you could tie a string betwen the tooth you want gone and the door knob and slam the door?)
A bandsaw blade might be good for making a profile cutter. You file the profile you want into the blade and run it along the wood until you get the profile you cut. If you want to get fancy, you can add handles or even add some support behind the blade.
Puckdropper
Reply to
Puckdropper
I mainly use thin hard steel from razor blades to car springs and flat pry bars for custom and replacement springs. The pry bar leaf spring cushions my sawmill's blade tensioner, which I set at 1000-1200 lbs. I forged a froe from a car spring.
Is this a wood or metal cutting blade?
Bandsaw blades for wood are soft enough to sharpen with a file and can be bent somewhat without breaking, as to set the teeth. When the one-man shop that resharpens my sawmill bands had trouble with his ageing equipment I made a roller filing guide and doubled the service life of my blades by touching up the 256 points. The custom spring in the guide indexes on the tooth gullet.
Metal cutting blades are much harder and difficult to rework, except by grinding or annealing and then hardening and tempering.
I ground the back edge of a long wood-cutting recip saw blade to a knife edge for a camping knife+saw but found it wasn't hard enough to stay sharp. As a saw it's been very useful, I even used it on the computer of an Apollo IC design workstation to allow a slightly larger replacement power supply to fit. Thus a hand-made tool helped me design a DRAM controller IC.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Marking knife - aye.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
They could be used in a decent pro scroll saw that has clamps instead of pin hooks.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
P.S. I have a couple worn out unbroken blades laying out in my scrap metal pile that I have no idea why I saved them. I guess I could resharpen them in a pinch. I guess I might do that only if I didn't have a spare on hand. Otherwise that would take longer than its worth.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
They make good scrapers for getting into corners and other small places where a full-size scraper won't fit.
Cleaning glue squeezeout in corners.
Reply to
Scott Lurndal
P.S. I have a couple worn out unbroken blades laying out in my scrap metal pile that I have no idea why I saved them. I guess I could resharpen them in a pinch. I guess I might do that only if I didn't have a spare on hand. Otherwise that would take longer than its worth.
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The shop that sharpens my 16' long, 3/4" tooth pitch sawmill blades has been charging $10 apiece, before the plagues of disease and inflation. (Frogs, locusts??) When his quality declined I made a filing jig that took about 10-15 seconds per tooth. Filing and setting them doesn't make sense cost-wise but it's a welcome seated rest for my knees after standing and carrying heavy cut planks and beams.
Dull metal-cutting blades can be used for friction sawing.
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I have a broken garage door spring that I've been saving for when I have a project idea and more time. I was thinking small cutting tools for woodcarving.
Reply to
Bill
Bob La Londe snipped-for-privacy@none.com on Sun, 21 Aug 2022 11:57:52 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
"Jim Wilkins" snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com on Sun, 21 Aug 2022 07:56:33 -0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I recall reading an article {back in the days when "the web" was something spiders made in the corner} about doing just that.
See!!!?!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Bob La Londe snipped-for-privacy@none.com on Sun, 21 Aug 2022 09:21:57 -0700 typed >> >>> Greetings all
Do they make a scroll saw which will handle a blade 1 (one) inch front to back?
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Bill snipped-for-privacy@att.net on Sun, 21 Aug 2022 20:40:26 -0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalwork>
I gave the one left spring bundle to a smith friend. The other one I kept because maybe some day ...
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
That is my downfall also. Whenever something breaks or wears out it does not get thrown away, on the chance that I will be able to use it for something someday.
Fortunately in my younger days we move ever 6 to 8 years, so those items had definite expiration dates and disappeared when we moved.
We have lived in this house longer than any house before, and the crevases are filling up. My wife does not want to move again, so I am going to have to look for another solution.
Reply to
knuttle
When my blacksmith shop was 100 yards from the wharf, I had a couple of guys who asked for two tools that I made from garage door spring. One was a sharp-pointed gaff to be fixed to a 3' wooden handle. The other was a short, blunt hook with a 'T' handle for removing the hooks from fish as long-line trawl was continuously mechanically hauled over the rail without getting the subsequently exposed fish hook where it wasn't supposed to go. The latter kept getting dropped overboard so that guy was a regular customer.
Reply to
Mike Spencer
When my blacksmith shop was 100 yards from the wharf, I had a couple of guys who asked for two tools that I made from garage door spring. One was a sharp-pointed gaff to be fixed to a 3' wooden handle. The other was a short, blunt hook with a 'T' handle for removing the hooks from fish as long-line trawl was continuously mechanically hauled over the rail without getting the subsequently exposed fish hook where it wasn't supposed to go. The latter kept getting dropped overboard so that guy was a regular customer. Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
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How do you temper spring stock for rough handling?
My one blacksmithing class was something of an apprenticeship. One task was to straighten the coil spring from a truck with hammer and anvil. I did it, but it was at the limit of what I could do by myself without other mechanical aid.
I just read in a locomotive history that 1-1/4" bar stock was the maximum that a blacksmith could forge weld in the 1840's. From other sources it appears that large steamboat crankshafts were a real struggle to forge weld without flaws. Steam engine development was limited by the ability to make increasingly larger and stronger parts.
By the 1850's American locomotive boilers operated around 90PSI. Watt's objection to the dangers of high pressure had little influence in the USA, and the greater grades and distances here caused designs to diverge from British practice. This is an example from the 1860's
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During the US Civil War cavalry destroyed railroads by heating the rails red hot in the middle on a stack of burning ties (sleepers) and then twisting them spirally or bending them around trees, which was easier for mounted troops without heavy tools. The South started it, calling them Mrs Lincoln's hair ties. That was a nuisance for the North but new rails were available. When Northern cavalry became able to raid the South their very limited industry couldn't as easily supply replacements and their military transportation was crippled.
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
knuttle <keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net on Sun, 21 Aug 2022 22:12:32 -0400 typed >> pyotr filipivich snipped-for-privacy@m>>> Greetings all
When I moved out of room I rented, the stack by the computer desk "for later" was almost as tall as the desk ...
We started about a year before the move trying to stick by "nothing comes in unless there is a space for it, or something will go out to make said space." Now, "What exactly will you do with it? And when? Be explicit."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich

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