4" bandsaw blade tracking

I was given a 4" Taiwan horizontal bandsaw. I also have a Wilton 4" bandsaw. The blades will not stay on the pullies on either one. I have adjusted the pullies so that they are coplanar. The blade will come off of the drive pulley in 1-2 revolutions. I went to Harbor Freight and checked the alignment of a new saw. The wheels are not coplanar. With a straight edge on the drive pulley there is a 3/16" gap at the bottom of the idler pulley and a 7/16 gap at the top. I tried setting the machine up this way and the blade still comes of of the lower pulley. I am now rotating the input pulley by hand to try and get the adjustment right as the motor turns too fast to try and adjust the tracking according to the manual. Does anyone have experience setting the tracking after assembly that can give me some hints on the initial setup? JackD.

Reply to
Jack Dannenberg
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When I bought a new one, I adjusted the wheels coplanar with shims/thrust washers, then installed the blade. I had the drive wheel off and put a tap handle on the shaft to be able to spin the drive wheel by hand, like you're doing. You should be able to find the screw in the floating (driven wheel) hub that's intended to adjust the "toe in/out", and adjust it for a little "back pitch" on that wheel, which should get you to where the blade tracks near the wheel shoulders (without running tightly against the shoulders).

Another key adjustent is the blade tension.. it can be (needs to be) cranked about as tight as you can get it by hand.

You'll find many helpful online resources for adjusting and modifying these saws by searching for 4x6 bandsaw or $200 bandsaw and modifications or similar terms.

Here's one

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WB ....................

Reply to
Wild Bill

Correction to earlier reply.. Pulley instead of wheel

When I bought a new one, I adjusted the wheels coplanar with shims/thrust washers, then installed the blade. I had the drive PULLEY off and put a tap handle on the shaft to be able to spin the drive wheel by hand, like you're doing. You should be able to find the screw in the floating (driven wheel) hub that's intended to adjust the "toe in/out", and adjust it for a little "back pitch" on that wheel, which should get you to where the blade tracks near the wheel shoulders (without running tightly against the shoulders).

Another key adjustent is the blade tension.. it can be (needs to be) cranked about as tight as you can get it by hand.

You'll find many helpful online resources for adjusting and modifying these saws by searching for 4x6 bandsaw or $200 bandsaw and modifications or similar terms.

Here's one

formatting link
WB ....................

Reply to
Wild Bill

When all else fails, check the blade(s). If you're using a good U.S. brand name blade, I'd expect no troubles. If you're using Asian import blades, look out. Tension needs to be as high as you can crank it, this puts it at the lower edge of acceptable tension for those size blades. If you're using a thicker than standard blade, you'll have tracking problems, too, they can't be tensioned properly, there's not enough meat in the frame.

Stan

Reply to
Stan Schaefer

I've been having trouble with mine as well. I got past the blades tracking off though. I found that if the guide bearings are squeezing the blade to much it tends to get squeezed forward and then the blade comes off the pulleys. While the machine was on I could adjust the bearings and see the blade more forward and back. Try slacking off the guide bearings put the blade on and see it it tracks ok.

Reply to
Doug Arthurs

The tilt adjustment of one of the wheels needs to be done while the blade is moving. Before the saw is turned on, adjust the bearings that control the left/right of the blade to where they are just touching the blade in the middle area. Then preliminaryly adjust the back bearings so that they just also touch the blade on the backside. Start the saw and adjust the tilt so that the blade just touches the back bearings and also check that the teeth are not riding on the either of the wheels. If the teeth are, adjust the back bearings so that the teeth clear the wheels. Readjust the tilt of the wheel so that the blade is again just kissing the back bearings most to just all of the time. Finally insure that the side bearings are all turning but can be stopped by a light pressure on the rotating part by your hand or other such item. At this point, your saw should be well adjusted and the last thing is to take a good cut of some piece of metal and see if it cuts straight. If the blade is new or otherwise in good condition, it should do a nice straight smooth cut.

-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works every time it is tried!

Reply to
Bob May

Hi Doug Always thought that the rule of thumb for setting up guides was a slip of paper on either side of blade . Gives just the right clearance . At least that is the way I was taught for wood blades . Maybe its different for metal but its what works for me . Ken Cutt

Reply to
Ken Cutt

Hi Ken

I'll have to give that a try. I don't know why the manuals for these things don't suggest tips like that.

Doug

Reply to
Doug Arthurs

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