weight of Doall 16" bandsaw?

I just put $20.00 down (and thats the selling price) for a old Doall 16"
band saw. It has a welder built in and needs some assembly but what the hell
$20.00 is fair. What does this thing weight? I was thinking of straping some
3/4 plywood to it and laying it down on the bed of my truck to move, any
problems with that? I will also be picking up (part of the deal) a very
small punch press table top thing just to dump for the seller and a few
other odds.
Reply to
Waynemak
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If it's a Metalmaster, or ML, or one of the other 16" saws without a hydraulic table, I'd say about 1200#. I've got a 1948 ML, and with some care and planning wouldn't be too concerned about moving it as you describe. I'd bring a good supply of blocking and nails in order to support the saw in places that won't do damage; there are knobs and levers sticking out on all sides.
On the other hand, the saw is not very top heavy, especially if you remove the table, which probably weighs 150-200#. I moved mine standing up, securely strapped on a flatbed.
Manuals are online on DoAll's site.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
I was not sure the best way to lift it up to get it on a trailer, laying down on the bed would help ith this.
Reply to
Waynemak
I forgot to ask is this a good machine? it is the ML with the big "what speed to use" dial on top. the table, lower wheel, motor and varaible drive parts are out but all there. The price is good but is worth all the effort? It sure looks like one hell of a machine.
Reply to
Waynemak
Wayne, you are a master scrounger! Congrats!
i
Reply to
Ignoramus2513
Thats a great deal. I paid $800 for mine and shortly after I bought it low gear stripped. I just tipped it into a trailer after removing the table top which is quite heavy.
stan
Reply to
stanley baer
Just curious, how were you planning on getting the machine into the back of the truck once it is laying down? I knew a guy that did this a lot and he rigged up a trailer with a 10,000 lb winch (like
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at the end nearest the hitch, just like on boat trailers. He would put heavy machinery on skids, fold down a ramp at the end of the trailer, grease the skids, and winch the machine onto the trailer. On the way out, he would hook the machine to a winch in the front of the shop, skid it off of the trailer, and put it on rollers to move it into place. Lesson: it is easier to pull heavy machinery into a truck than try to push it in.
Reply to
woodworker88
lay the top on the bed, the base still on the ground, use winch to pull it up in. The wood frame would protect it and make loading safer. At home I have a tractor with a bucket loader so unloading is less work. the table, supports, motor, transmission are all off the machine now so the main frame is a bit lighter than the the whole machine.
Reply to
Waynemak
IMO, you won't find much better in a small bandsaw, except perhaps a Grob like Peter mentioned. The design is low-tech and bullet proof. Parts are available from DoAll, but not cheap.
The only complaint I have with mine is that the speed tops out at 1500 FPM, which is too slow for efficient friction sawing.
I made a set of guides that twist the blade 90 degrees so it can cut off long stock.

I learned later that DoAll actually made similar guides, though not with rollers and with only a 45 degree twist.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
I have a licensed copy of a Grob Bros 18" saw. Guesstimated weight over 500 kg. I tried lifting it with a 250kg chain block. no go. A 750kg one worked nicely.
Agree WRT weight distribution - most of the weight is low down. Take the table off and it becomes even more bottom heavy, no great risk of toppling if you're moderately careful.
As for price - I paid $600 for mine and another $400 to ship it 2 states from where I bought it. Money well spent and it's paid for itself already. For the price you paid, as long as the wheels go round & round with the blade tracking true, you're in front. You can always scrap the entire drive train if it's all crap and still have a big robust bandsaw.
PDW
Reply to
Peter Wiley
I have a 1952 VS16, it's #800. The seller lifted it with a strap under the head, by the column, and it lifted quite straight. They also had a scale because they sell equipment, so I believe the weight is accurate. It's weight is spread top to bottom, so tie it well. I have the welder, but no auto-feed, so it is a basic model. I carried it in a trailer, then tilted the trailer and rolled it (slowly!) out by putting pipe under it. I've made a rolling base for mine so I can move it out of the way when not using it.
O yea, DoAll does not have the old manuals online. I believe the online ones stop around 1960. They do sell them (~ $50), as well as the electrical diagrams (which are only 1 page). There is an eBay vendor who occasionally has manuals, watch for it there. Alex
Reply to
AHS
Sounds like a good idea to me.
Reply to
woodworker88
Sounds about right. I'd guess that an ML weighs 2-300# more, with most of the difference tied up in the cable feed, which includes a large cast iron counterweight down near the base.
All the manuals, back to at least 1938 for the ML, are here (which is probably where those on ebay cam from ):
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Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons

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