$200 bandsaw tuneup?

I have a $200 bandsaw wearing Grizzly paint.
I use the thing all the time, and most of the time it doesn't really matter
when the cuts are a little off. However, here lately it's been bugging me
that every cut is slanted.
The faster I cut, the worse the deflection. So I've cranked the feed
tension up to a point where it takes absolutely for blasted ever to cut
through a piece of, say, bed frame. I have it set for the slowest speed,
with a 28 tpi blade (I think...), and I have the moveable guide as close to
the work as it can be. As the blade travels down through the work, it
wants to wander to the outside, away from the vise, time and again.
With the aforementioned attempts to get it to cut well, I can usually touch
up the edge with a few passes on a disc sander. However, I just did a job
that had to be really close, and I had to try three times to cut the
material sufficiently oversized to be able to grind it down to just the
perfect fit.
Having just tuned up my table saw and really improved my woodworking
precision, I'm starting to wonder if maybe there isn't some similar
procedure I can do to get this bandsaw to behave.
Maybe if I were welding this stuff it wouldn't even matter so much, but I
have no welding capability. It's all bolt/pop rivet work. Specifically, I
just made some aluminum frames to fit around chess piece trays, and I
wasted a lot of stock without ever getting them quite right. Aluminum is
of course much more likely to come out crooked, because it cuts faster.
Anyway, suggestions appreciated. I know there are a million of these things
out there.
Reply to
Silvan
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Have you tried the FAQ?
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GWE
Silvan wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
The 3 most frequent reasons for blade wander I have found are Worn blade Too fast a material feed Blade not parallel to cut
John
Reply to
John Manders
Try
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for tips.
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
Before you blame the saw, try something other than bed frame, and try a new blade. Some bed frame is really tough stuff, and you may have taken the set out of your blade, or dulled the teeth.
John Martin
Reply to
JMartin957
On my 4X6, I found the cause of slanted cut to be worn guide roller bearings, they let the band turn inward. My slant was to the inside tho, not to the outside. Replacing the worn bearings fixed the problem, cuts as good as ever now.
Steve
Reply to
Steve Steven
You mention bed frame which can be quite hard. If you are using carbon steel blades, especially cheap ones, that's probably the problem. I'm using 14tpi Morse bi-metal blades and frequently cut bed frame. A recent cut on a piece of 1"D steel round stock only required a 10 thou facing cut to clean up the end.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
I might add, buy a new brand-name blade. Lenox makes good ones, they're on the shelf at the my local hardware store, MSC would be one web source. The chink ones seem to be made of old banding iron.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
I think a variable tooth 10-14 blade (bi-metal is preferred) might be a better general purpose one to use (28 tpi is pretty fine) and I would not use the slowest speed. Most of time the middle pulley setting works for most stuff unless it is something really hard.
You don't say how old your saw is, but unless you use it a whole lot and/or you have had it for quite a while, it might just could use an adjustment in the bearings that guide saw blade to make it cut more square.
Reply to
Phil Teague
I have a 4 x 6 in the UK and as delivered it cut very slanted and slow. When the worm and wheel mesh was adjusted correctly so that it wasn't sapping all the power and test cuts and adjustments made it now cuts within at least 0.010" over 4 " which is as good as the local steel supplier. Worth the £170 delivered with tax when the thing is setup just for the freedom to buy stock and cut. Regarding frame mitering you may need to be very accurate. I have made square frames from 6" wide brass 'J' section with about 42" sides, These were done to minutes of arc on a rotary table and bridgeport in order that 2 sides soft soldered in a jig would mate with the other 2 sides and show minimal join. It didn't help that the sections were all slightly different width and trig was involved to calculate the mitre correct angle. I have done similar with 2" wide Al frames and it depends on your standards. The gap if varying very slightly in width due to the wrong angle can be seen. The local engineering supplier tried this and with their cold cutoff saw could not do an accurate join with the markings on the saw at 45. Not worth their while to get the accuracy required.
Silvan wrote:
Reply to
David Billington
Well, that's three for a new blade. I never thought about the relative hardness of bed frame having an effect on the thing. That's by no means the *only* thing I cut with this saw, but I have cut up more than a few bed frames as a cheap (ie free) source of material.
It still cuts anything I run it through, but there's no telling how long I've had the same blade on there. I have a tendency to run things until they break, long after they've stopped performing well. Sanding belts, saw blades, guitar strings....
I have an extra blade on hand. Maybe I'll just try that.
Thanks to you, and everyone else for the tips...
Reply to
Silvan
Hey, cool ideas there indeed!
Reply to
Silvan
I have a 4x6 from a Homier tool truck sale (and most of 'em are the same), and there were some very poorly fit parts on it, just out of the box.
The saw was nearly fully disassembled before I started using it, and the one particular part that would've made it cut poorly (on a compound angle), was the strut/arm that props up the back side of the saw (from the pivot shaft). This strut bolts onto the saw casting, and needed about 3/16" of shim to get the cross-section of the blade pointed vertical. Longer, graded bolts and washers were used to hold the strut securely.
If the sides of the blade guide bearings aren't square to the bed, I don't think you'll be able to get the 90 degree cut.
WB ..................
Reply to
Wild Bill
Nice page, Bill. I added a link to it on my 4x6 bandsaw FAQ page.
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Grant Erwin
Wild Bill wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Hi Chuck, this bounced when sent to your yahoo address..
I sent a reply to your request shortly after I received it in Oct, but that's email for ya (like most things), it's great when it works right.
I put a couple of web pages together that show most of the modifications and refinements that were done on my saw.
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If you've done other improvements, I'd appreciate hearing about them
WB
----- Original Message ----- From: To: "Wild Bill" Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2003 12:51 PM Subject: Re: $200 bandsaw tuneup?
WB, Chuck here, (retired ironworker) I have the same problem, all of my cuts get welded, but I would still like them to be 'right'. If possible could you do me a favor,,,, I 'see' ,,,,,, almost,,,,,,, in my minds eye what you are talking about aligning the saw,,,, but it would be sooooo much better if you could send some pictures. If you can. Apprecaiate it very much. Chuck Lorentson 73
Reply to
Wild Bill
Grant, the master of understatement sez:
"Nice page, Bill. I added a link to it on my 4x6 bandsaw FAQ page."
Much better than "nice", Grant! It was esp. good to get both your's and Bill's files in directly printable forms.
In order to prolong the life of the original Chinese motor, you can open the motor and drill some ventilation holes in both end bells. Use a small drill, say 1/8", and drill holes close together, forming a screen. Take care to not drill so many holes as to substantially weaken the end bells. This will allow some cooling air to flow into the motor and the 1/8" "mesh" will prevent larger swarf from entering the motor.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Bob Swinney
Cant seem to find the OP, But just fore reference - next time you're cutting aluminum, cut it on your TABLESAW instead much better almost perfect cuts. - be careful and practice slowly first - all the other suggestions for bandsaw tuneup are good to
Tom
modifications
Reply to
surftom
I tried that before I got my bandsaw. I get almost as good cuts on the bandsaw every time compared to the best I got on the table saw. Never tried cutting anything as big as the 5"D piece I cut the other day. I think that would be *really* dangerous. Add the noise and need for constant undivided attention and I'll stick to the bandsaw.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Tip: One of the woodworking magazines was using aluminum for guides and had to cut a bunch. The guy cut through the store price(upc?) sticker and found there was a nice clean edge. After that he ran masking tape along the edge to be cut and didn't have to clean up the metal after the cut.
Joel. phx
I stopped this practice after the saw blade lost a few teeth. Wonder where they went :(
Reply to
Joel Corwith

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