Swage Block

I have been following this group for a short time, and have picked up some very interesting and informative ideas. Being a relative new comer to blacksmithing as a hobby, I would like to ask
the best method of mounting a Swage Block. Is it best to mount it on a block of wood similar to an Anvil? Thanks in advance.
Regards Steve
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Since a swage block can be used on all sides, I've seen more fabricated stands instead of block of wood. Check out: http://www.iforgeiron.com/Tools/swedge%20block.htm to see what I mean. Mine is similar to the second one down, with racks for hammer storage.
FWIW, that sire, www.iforgeiron.com, is another nice and informative site.
-Marc
On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 20:49:23 +1030, Steve Ahrens wrote:

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On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 20:49:23 +1030, "Steve Ahrens"
I'm tempted to suggest just leaving the damned thing where it is and not wasting good workshop space on having one of the useless things around! Maybe I'm biased - helped a friend crane a 220kg one into his workshop last week. It's of a size where I just can't see a use for it, outside a shipyard.
Swage blocks are usually mounted in a cast stand, so that they can be rotated to have either edge upwards, or laid across the stand to allow access to the side holes. The stand is a narrow rectangular frame at the top, with a support underneath to stop it falling right through. Some angle iron and a stick welder would make one pretty easily.
You may also find that your swage block only has one useful edge. IMHE, it's only the half rounds that are of the slightest use.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Mine has square and round holes in it. When lying flat, I can mount just about any hardie tool in one of its square holes. Mine also has a dished out hollow for a soup bowl and it is very handy for knocking out any small dishing. I'm just getting going but I find I use my swage block.
Grant
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On Sat, 6 Dec 2003, Grant Erwin wrote:

I use mine quite a lot too, and wish I had a better one. Different styles of work I guess, and the different things we make. Narrowing the ends of pipes, or rounding them to hemispheres, the half-round grooves support the work so you don't get flats. I like them for truing up omega-shaped shackles (hasps, slider guides). And quite a few decorative details.
Conrad Hodson
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I am with grant. I have a small swage block designed for spoons and dishing and I use it allot. and mine is still living on the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket.I thought there was some good ideas on the link from marc Godbout. good luck.
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I haven't done anything with mine yet, but I've heard that traditionally, one would use a stump. Cut a groove into the stump wide enough to set the swage up on end (and maybe half as deep as it). It can still be laid flat on top to use either of the sides.
Michael
On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 20:49:23 +1030, "Steve Ahrens"

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If you ever find yourself drifting large holes with long drifts (such as when making hammers), a swage block can be handy if it's mounted so that its holes aren't blocked by anything underneath.
Bert

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