CNC Aptitude

Does anyone have a set of questions they ask of a potential new hire-ee that you would qualify training him/her on a CNC?

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Thanks,
Rick

CNC Products Inc.
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I would take a sampling of AMC posts over the years, from all the regulars, ask the applicant to separate them into the 3 categories: the Pros, the Hacks, and the Absolutely Full of Shit about Everything.
The correct Profile:
Absolutely Full of Shit About Everything: Jon Banquer The Hack: Me (Proctologically Violated) Pros: most everyone else.
If the applicant gets only AFoSAE right, I'd hire/train them.
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Mr. PV'd, looking for import Prep H.



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snet wrote:

This is an easy way to find out what the person's experience includes.
a. Ask the applicant to tell you 7 things he knows about machining.
b. Then have him/her/whatever to elaborate on each of the 7 items.
c. The answers you seek will be in the elaborations.
Let the applicant tell you about whatever experience they may have.
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Michael Gailey
Artistic CNC Mill, Router and Engraver Programming
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You would also need to know if the person is coming from a manual machining background, or is totally "off the street". The aptitude Qs should undoubtedly change with background.
A person could, theoretically, know absolutely nothing about machining (and therefore draw a blank on the above line of questioning), but still have quite a bit of aptitude.
It really is an inneresting Q, and an important one, if an employer is to nip walking workplace disasters like jb in the bud.
My understanding is that companies charge big bucks to develop questionnaires to determine aptitude, and is done from very indirect seemingly irrelevant lines of Qs. Don't know if this is the only way to do it.
Also, aptitude does not necessarily coincide with fulfillment from a line of work--if anyone gives a g-d about personal satisfaction. But which I believe counts in the long run.
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PV'd
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ask what does he/ she know about your company and what cnc is; ask how do they know, see if they had the initiative to look it up on the net.
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If you are training, work ethic, desire to learn and some mechanical aptitude are important, everything else can be taught.
Did post an operators test a long time ago. http://tinyurl.com/5n8wrn Jon Banquer would have been weeded out by question #28.
Tom
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These are great answers but I failed to give you more information and I apologize. Currently my company hires from a temp agency and then they throw the guy on a cnc to be watched by the last guy they hired from the temp agency. I'm trying to break that habit by taking the guy, who I must ASSUME know NOTHING about a cnc, and giving him a set of questions to determine if the guy is TRAINABLE. I'm guessing this would be some sort of mechanical aptitude test? What level of education would you make the minimum?
Any ideas?
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Thanks,
Rick

CNC Products Inc.
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That is idiotic. Sadly, I work where they often do the same thing. Nothing gives me the chills like two temps peering intently at a control pushing buttons. I'm in the fixing it after they crash it biz.
Level of education? Balancing a checkbook accurately, able to make change w/o a calculator would be a good start.
You have my sympathy.
Wes
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Rick, Mike Lynch is in your backyard. www.cncci.com CNC Concepts, Inc. Check out his site and call him. He trains for a living. His column has been in Modern Machine Shop every month for the past 20 years. He lives in Cary IL. JR
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