Mazak T32 128 Emergency Stop


Our T32 lathe is getting a 128 Emergency Stop alarm. Which, by looking
at the manual, says the e-stop is active. Push/Pull the e-stop a few
times, nothing. The alarm is associated with a blinking spindle stop
button and lit NC Alarm LED on the operator panel. Any thoughts? I know
this is pretty vague, but it's all I have to go on right now.
Reply to
bytecolor
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LOL.
I once spent 2 days finding out that low lube would do that. :) Our maintained man was on vacation, and nobody else thought to do the job that was always done for us. Needless to say, I'm not a machine tech. :)
Reply to
Dave Lyon
The E Stop signal chain is usually a series set of connections that go through the servo drives, spindle drives, extreme OT LS 's etc. You will probably have to check your wiring diag's. and jumper across each one of these series connections to isolate the problem. But sounds like it might be generated through your spindle drive.
Wendell
Reply to
SXMWendell
"bytecolor" wrote in news:1149179150.526041.236840 @i40g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
Get out your trusty meter and check the switch. May have a contact loose or the switch may be bad, especially if they use it a lot. Check the one by the tool changer door also, and on the pendant, if equipped.
Check the alarm history page also for possible further clues. That alarm is specific to an E-Stop switch. If it were spindle drive, or other drive, you would have a different alarm.
Reply to
Anthony
Waylube is good!
I found out there was also a loud POP with the alarm. After further investigation, there is a fried component on the spindle drive board? I think. In the upper right corner of the board, there is a column of 12 diodes with green componentes between each. Each green component has 6 inline leads (resistor packs?). Third from the top looks like it exploded. Doesn't look like the easy fix I was hoping for.
Reply to
bytecolor
"bytecolor" wrote in news:1149183459.858298.257870 @f6g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:
I'd check the spindle motor for a short.
Reply to
Anthony
"bytecolor" wrote in news:1149179150.526041.236840 @i40g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
If the lathe has a bar loader on it make sure the e-stop isn't depressed on the bar feed control. Ditto with a gantry etc...
Reply to
D Murphy
Someone is supposed to come out Monday to check it out. It's gotten beyond my comfort zone.
On a different subject, Anthony... You posted once about a parameter that I could use to set the counter on a Mazak? The parts counter on the position page, I think. Do you remember? I figured you could grep your posts far better than I.
Reply to
bytecolor
We bar-pull everything, Dan. But I remember having that very issue using bar feeders in the past.
Reply to
bytecolor
"bytecolor" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@i40g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
Actually....you put it in your program.. next to the last line, put in a M198 Q1 (M198 == Part counter, Q1 == Increment) Example: N305 G53 G0 G40 X0.0 Y0.0 T0000 M19 N310 M198 Q1 N320 M30
Reply to
Anthony
Cool. I'll see if my M-Plus will accept that tomorrow. Thanks.
Reply to
bytecolor
"bytecolor" wrote in news:1149203856.239904.307350 @c74g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
Known to work on T Plus, M 32, 640 Fusion Dunno about M Plus, but should.
Reply to
Anthony
"bytecolor" wrote in news:1149203856.239904.307350 @c74g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
Btw, to clear the counter, you just tab down to highlight the number on the position screen and enter 0
Reply to
Anthony
Jumper??? Ack!!! That's a real bad idea.
There's a REASON the machine is in an E-stop state. And that reason may be that it's real, REAL unsafe to be in any other state. Putting a jumper across the open contact could let the control deliver power to something big and nasty, and could cause more problems than I even want to think about. (Big geysers of high-pressure hydraulic oil, fires, the sudden slamming open/closed of air-driven stuff, $5,000 servo drives melting in front of your eyes, runaway servo motors wrecking bearings, screws, and/or people, and more, are just the first things that come to mind BEFORE I give the question a lot of thought.)
A MUCH better approach is to look through the diagnostics and the ladder diagram, and to find out which part of the E-stop series circuit is open. That way, you'll know what you're dealing with BEFORE you actually try to deal with it. If ladder logic and diagnostics are unfamiliar to you, then you'll just need to accept the fact that jumper wires and "tricking" the machine are out of your range, too; and you'll have to get help from someone who knows how to deal with the problem well and safely.
That said, it's true that E-stop situations often happen for small and silly reasons - like just a loose wire on a limit switch, or even on the E-Stop button itself. But until you know, you really, REALLY don't want to too bold or careless about how you handle the problem.
Please!
KG
Reply to
Kirk Gordon
Or, you can just scroll to the counter on the Position page and input a number. The first (left-hand) number is the current count. The second (right hand) number is the stop target. When the current count equals the stop count, the machine (assuming it's in continuous run mode) comes to a stop.
KG
Reply to
Kirk Gordon

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