Question on machining ferrite toroids

Have an inquiry about modifying very small ferrite toroids. The customer
wants some flats and a slot cut through. I did a basic hand shaping of
the flats with a diamond file and cut the slot with a small diamond
blade I just happened to have. Looks to cut pretty easy with diamond,
but I'm wondering if anyone has machined this stuff with anything other
than diamond. Quantities would run from the low hundreds to several
thousand a year. They know what a pain this is and are willing to pay.
It's all but a done deal if I say I can do it.
Parts are .231 OD, .115 ID and .062 thick, the slot is .035 right
through the side. Small and fragile.... I'm looking at 4 setups to grind
these, but if I could mill them, might get away with just 2. I've
noticed the stuff is slightly magnetic and some grit from the grinding
sticks to the part. Assuming carbide or similar will cut this with some
semblance of tool life, I'll have to deal with these particles to keep
from recutting them, something that surely will shorten tool life....
Anyone with applicable experience?
Thanks,
Jon
Reply to
Jon Anderson
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Here is a thread where I recently did something similar. Used carbide, at 90 sfm. Fixturing was really the question, as the size I was making was a possible issue. The parts were Very fragile! Using flood colant, the coolant was more "aggressive" than the smaller 1/32" EM. So, re-cutting chips was not on my list of concerns, also the 90 sfm rate as recomended by the material supplier, doesn't create such a storm of re-cut chips. Thirdly the size of your parts means that part changing time will be as significant as cutting time, so optimizing the SFM/cutting speed won't be as much of a concern as some other, larger parts.
I'd say go for it, but my experience is limited.
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Reply to
Half-nutz
Arrgh.... someone replied, and I accidentally closed your post before clicking the link. I'd already closed the a.m.c. window and I have it set to delete all read messages. Could you please repost that link? Much appreciated!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Anderson
Repost.
Here is a thread where I recently did something similar. Used carbide, at 90 sfm. Fixturing was really the question, as the size I was making was a possible issue. The parts were Very fragile! Using flood colant, the coolant was more "aggressive" than the smaller 1/32" EM. So, re-cutting chips was not on my list of concerns, also the 90 sfm rate as recomended by the material supplier, doesn't create such a storm of re-cut chips. Thirdly the size of your parts means that part changing time will be as significant as cutting time, so optimizing the SFM/cutting speed won't be as much of a concern as some other, larger parts.
I'd say go for it, but my experience is limited.
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Reply to
Half-nutz
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Reply to
Bipolar Bear
Half-nutz,
Thank you for reposting the link, lots of good ideas there. I thought these parts were tiny and fragile, but they're pretty darn stout compared to what you were making! Glad to hear you had a good outcome.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Anderson

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