Rapid prototyping

Awl --
On PBS's Independent Lens, "Objectified", on the "process of design", some design firm referred to "rapid prototyping", going from cad to prototyped
product in an apparent semi- flash. They showed a snippet of sumpn sumpn being made, some kind of grip. Don't know in fact how quick this thing was actually made.
Inyone know about this? How does this jive with trad'l cnc milling/turning?
Mildly inneresting program on the design process, form vs. function, etc. Don't quite know what the gist of the program was, other than perhaps the digital age being the mindfuck -- and the designfuck -- of effing humanity. goodgawd.....
The japanese toothpick was perty elegant, tho.
--
EA, in fact in very deep EA, anticipating butt another very deep PV'g.




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Existential Angst wrote:

EA:
    Stereo Lithography has been around for a couple of decades. But it was mainly done with plastic and the surface finish was often pretty rough. We used to do work for a Stereo Lithography company. I'm sure they've improved the process greatly over the years.
    Recently they've been able to do the same essential process with metals, although they probably call it something else like laser sintering.     The process can make things that aren't able to be machined. It's not instantaneous like a Star Trek replicator though. LOL      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereo_lithography
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_prototyping
http://www.mmsonline.com/zones/metalworking/rapid.aspx
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Wow, dats some BigDick stuff, yo.
I must be an example of Geologic Time Prototyping..... proly related to my graph-paper cadcam system....
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EA


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and it now is more generally termed as 3D printing.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07QxFQ3uUFw


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnRSHk9Y2e4&feature=related

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wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
QxFQ3uUFw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnRSHk9Y2e4&feature=related

the term is used to cover all types and forms of stereo lithography producing a 3D shape.
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wrote:

SLA stereo lithography is made out of a type of liquid epoxy. A laser hardens' the shape layer by layer. Using 3D CAD data - a SLA file. It needs supports as its made, later they are cut off. Depending on the step up amount is how course the finish model is. They can be hand finished snaded/painted for display purpose only because they are fragile. Mainly a touchy feely test for fit, throw around the table for the big wigs to see how the product looks. If'n yer a moldmaker, they worth their weight in gold to see what means what & how to make the mold. IE the part is your electrode shape. Depending on part size, its a long process usually run over night. for 1 part. cost? about a grand?
FDM fused deposition model - a very course 3D representation using a cheaper alternitive to SLA - not as accurate about +- 1/64
Laser Sintered machine can make temp molds/parts out of powdered metal. - weak & can have voids. good for quick low volume prototype work. The net part is, it can form internal water lines as its made. The parts still need finishing like screw hole taps ect.
That my 2c.
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