how to wire Allen Bradley SLC500 to 120V power?

I am trying to learn this PLC and need to wire it to the wall outlet (120V). Could someone please tell me how its done. I am confused mainly because the
connector shows multiple pins. Here is what I seen when I opened the main power source.
PWR OUT +24VDC PWR OUT COM 120/240VAC VAC NEUT CHASSIS GRND
I have a feeling the last three must be it, but don't want to do anything stupid and fry the unit by accident.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Orc General wrote:

Your feeling is correct, with a pre-made cord it should wire black to "120/240 VAC" white to "VAC Neut" and green to ground.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You also need to make sure the 120/240 volt jumper is in the 120 volt position. As always, more information can be found by going to http://www.ab.com /, then following the links to Publications Library -> Manuals On-line.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

because
anything
Oh wait, isn't AC power source the same on either wire? Why is black and white wire being differentiated? I thought the two are interchangeable for AC power? Suppose I don't have a premade cable but only a cable with the three prongs (ie. your standard computer power cable). How do I make sure the right wire of the three goes to the correct pin?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Orc General wrote:

Power is traditionally distributed as 240V centertapped. White is the centertap, at most a few volts between it and a water pipe. Black is "hot". That's why polarized plugs are required. Sometimes, when both run together, blue or red is the other hot.
It's all in the code, which is a good thing to know about if you mess with the stuff. How much current is allowed in a wired circuit using #12 wire? How much is allowed in a #12 extension cord? (It's not the same.) If such restrictions are ignored and there's a fire, insurance might not cover it.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just cut the end off the computer power cable. In the US you will normally find a black wire that measures 120 VAC to both ground (the green wire) and neutral (the white wire). The ground and neutral are often tied together in the breaker box.
With so much equipment coming from Asia, where they sell into worldwide markets, the power cord you cut up may not have black, white, and green wires. In this case the hot lead will be brown, the neutral will be blue, and the ground will be green with a yellow trace.
Mark Walsh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
and
normally
and
in
The wall plug (of a computer power cable) that goes into the wall outlet (120V)
|++++++++++++++| | | | A B | | # # | | # C # | | # # # | | # | | # | | | \++++++++++++/
Ok, just to recap. Once I cut the end off the computer cable, I should get three conducting wire out of it. The important one is the one that goes to ground, which according the the diagram above should be the bottom middle one labeled as 'C'. The other two (A &B) goes to live AC 120V and polarity doesn't matter (Canada). Right? By the way, I will check continuity with a multimeter to make sure the wires are correct. I just spend quite a bit of $ to pick up a AB SLC500 and don't want anything bad to happen to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looking at the convenience outlet on the wall, A (the longer slot) is neutral, B is the hot lead, C is the ground. As I recal, the electrical codes in Canada are the same as the US.
Pick up a cheap meter, if you are working with PLC's it'll be handy. A to C should be a few volts. A to B should read ~120 VAC. B to C should read ~120 VAC.
Mark Walsh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Orc General wrote:
...

It is best to use a fixed-width font for newsgroups, and almost imperative for ASCII art of any kind. "Courier New" is a good choice.
...
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.