How not to wire the pool area

Simply shocking what some people do.
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Best Regards
Tom.
Reply to
azotic
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"azotic" wrote: Simply shocking what some people do. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I'm not shocked. If it bothered me that much, I would take it out the same way they put it in--with Photoshop.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
That doesn't look edited to me, but it does look deliberately posed.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
"Christopher Tidy" wrote: That doesn't look edited to me, but it does look deliberately posed. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Have you watched the David Letterman bit called, "Will it Float?" What we have depicted here is a pair of flip-flops (footwear), supporting a four-outlet electical thing. I don't think the flip-flops would float by themselves, much less support the additional weight they are shown carrying. Then we have an electric cord coming straight up for about 6", but it doesn't tip. I say it was probably photographed on the deck and "cloned" in.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Aren't those flip flops made from foamy stuff?
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
I don't see any way to tell if the power is "live" or not - doesn't look like photoshop to me, but it is obviouisly a setup to make a point - why else would all the folks be looking at the camera
Reply to
William Noble
Also no food on the grill. These guys look like Russians.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29897
That photo is a fake.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
they float
Reply to
kfvorwerk
Because someone said they were just about to turn on the power.
Looks like a German or Dutch electrical socket to me.
Reply to
David Billington
Crom yes. I found that out a couple years ago with a machine tool mounted on rubber feet, on a rubber cable with no ground and a leak from L3 to the case of the machine.
Laid down on the floor to check something on the bottom side, and reached up and grabbed the machine to pull myself up. Hot day, nice and sweaty (big back sweater).
The guy at the next machine saw me doing the Trout out of Water thingy and knocked me loose. For which Im forever grateful.
It was at least 2 weeks before my testicles dropped back into place....
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I don't see anything that suggests that the photo is fake. It may suggest that the electricity is on but common sense would tell you it is not. If you look at the photos in the data gallery index
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it seems to be a bunch of frat type guys doing what frat guys do when drinking. Jesse
Reply to
Jesse
The level of current stupidity notwithstanding, nobody is *that* stupid. JR Dweller in the cellar
azotic wrote:
Reply to
JR North
Hi Nick
You are a thinking kind of guy. What is your thought about what would happen if the cord *was* plugged in to a generator? (A generator with no connection to ground.) I thought that socket was for 200 volt cirtuits. If the socket did have ~200 volts between terminals, and they both contacted the water, is it likely that the people would be in a high potetial area? Does anyone know what happens if 220 VAC across terminals spaced 1 inch apart is imersed in swimming pool water?
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry
On straight line connecting the terminals the gradient is 220V/inc therefore an ant 1/2" long midway between the terminals would feel like touching a110V outlet with the hand while standing on the neutral wire.
To visualize the electrical field emanating from the socket, allow some simplification and inaccuracies, still leaving the concept intact. If you draw a circle 10 feet in diameter centered 5 feet from the outlet on a line perpendicular to the 1" spacing, you can think as the 220V are evenly spaced across the 31.4 feet of the circumference. A man 6 feet tall floating tangent to such circle will be exposed to 6x220/31.4 or nearly 40V. If the man was standing in the water on the same circle, at breast level, arms down, looking toward the outlet, the 2 feet or so across its thorax would feel about 13V.
For every roughly circular path you can draw around the outlet you can apply the same concept, the voltage gradient will be 220/path-lenght.
In reality the lines of constant gradient are not circles even under ideal conditions. I a real pool depend from the water composition and distribution, the location and conductivity of the wall and the structures immersed, swimmers included and their geometry.
For example if the wall were made of copper, then the voltage between any two points would be minuscule.
Mauro
Reply to
MG
Hi Mauro
As I read your post above, it appears that there is little danger to the guys shown in the picture. Did I read it right??
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry
It does look very much like a Shuko power strip (German standard, 220 volt) used in a number of countries around the world.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster
Wanna bet??????
OTOH, pool water isn't all that conductive. Water in general isn't very conductive unless it has something like salt in it (consider all the Christmas lighting set-ups out in the rain...). And, of course, to get a jolt, one has to make themselves part of the circuit, i.e., connect themselves between power and ground. Just being in an energized pool wouldn't do it (consider the little bird perched on the power line...).
So, they'd probably get away with it...
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster
You just have to look at the URL, to conclude they are Germans. And yes, this are "Schuko" ("Schutzkontakt" = protective earth contact) plugs and no, we do have 230V. :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
First the assumption of a "floating" generator you expressed is not guaranteed in the pictures, the source may be grounded on one side, in that case things get complicated, the man can be touching the bottom (grounded) and be close to the Hot side and get 220V.
Second what I wrote is based MY understanding basic physic principles, before anybody risk THEIRS lives to verify this they should make their own research.
The common wisdom of not mixing water and electricity is fundamentally sound. Large, wet skin surfaces loaded with body weight are better contact (lower resistance) than a dry fingertip gently brushing a small electrified screw head, for example.
Ultimately, is not necessarily the voltage that is dangerous, is the current across the body muscles, particularly the hearth. Some of the voltage available from the generator is "lost" to push the current across all the connections and what is left is actually across the body.
The official safe voltage is around 40V, I do not remember the details, the lowest body resistance is 2000 ohms and a current of 10 mA through the hearth is often lethal.
The fact that 40V across 2000 ohms produces 20mA and the voltage is still considered safe may be rationalized by considering that not all the current is going to flow through sensitive organs.
Mauro
Reply to
MG

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