How to cut this copper coil

I got a bit lucky and bought a broken air dryer that had a big copper coil inside. This is a heat exchanging coil with a copper tube inside
a tube.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/coil.jpg
The problem is that it is extremely heavily made and would not easily cut with a cable cutter. I want to cut it up into pieces and clean to make #1 copper.
Any idea what can cut it, maybe a circular saw with a small tooth blade?
Thanks
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2017 22:07:22 -0500, Ignoramus9502

That's probably worth a fortune as #1 copper. Oh, it's down from $3 (when I last looked) to $2.28/lb, but still valuable.

How about a recip saw for a deeper cut? If it's soft, a 12" woodcutting blade might work, though it might leave rough edges. Cut it in half and clean from there.
What takes that white gunk off? What is that?
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message wrote: >I got a bit lucky and bought a broken air dryer that had a big copper

That's probably worth a fortune as #1 copper. Oh, it's down from $3 (when I last looked) to $2.28/lb, but still valuable.

How about a recip saw for a deeper cut? If it's soft, a 12" woodcutting blade might work, though it might leave rough edges. Cut it in half and clean from there.
What takes that white gunk off? What is that? ============================================================ I'm guessing the white stuff is your basic hard water deposits, calcium and magnesium carbonates and/or sulfates and/or other salts. It always tempting to start throwing acids at the problem to dissolve them, but then you are going to have a big volume of hazardous waste to get rid of. How about cutting the tubing with bolt cutters, and trying something like a small air hammer with a wide flat tip to vibrate off as much of the white stuff as you can. Maybe hit the coil before you cut it up to knock off big chunks, then each length after you cut it up. Finish with a wire brush. As much as I love chemistry, mechanical methods are almost always faster :-). Save any acid for a final polishing step only if really needed.
----- Regards, Carl Ijames
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No, it is expanding urethane foam.

Way too thick for bolt cutters, over an inch thick, and inside the tubing there is one more tubing (it is a heat exchanger). So it is like a double tube.

I was really hoping that there is a blade for a circular saw that would work.
i
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On Sun, 09 Apr 2017 08:52:32 -0500, Ignoramus14657

Copper is "sticky" so a circular saw isn't ideal. A portable band saw would be ideal, but a recip would do the job. Either way, there WILL be some "fun" involved. I also have a "shear" that would "likely" do the job, but you would need to uncoil everything first.
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OK, I have a hydraulic cable cutter that worked today. The cutter head and power supply were initially unrelated.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Coil-1.jpg
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Coil-2.jpg
I realized that if I cut some tubes first, I can unroll the coil tube by tube.
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On Sun, 09 Apr 2017 20:47:09 -0500
<snip>

That looks really nice. Should do a good job on this.
Thought you might have something like that around. You are quite the scrounger :)
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I bought the pump on craigslist and the cutting head I bought new from a retailer.
i
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message wrote:

The quick disconnects used on Porta Powers are handy for other things. http://shop.hoseandfittings.com/catalog/Porta-Power/Hydraulic_Accessories.html
-jsw
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On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 18:51:55 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Just be sure to put the plastic plugs/covers back on every fitting every time. (I got chewed out at the body shop for forgetting once.)
Amazon is slightly cheaper and has free 2-day Prime shipping if you're a Prime member. It's $99/yr and they just told me I had saved $289 last year in shipping fees.
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Jim, thanks. I have another high pressure hydraulic set up for 10,000 psi. With a pneumatic/hydraulic pump and a number of cylinders. All bought piecemeal on auctions and some taken out of a custom machine that never saw use. I just finished it last week and it does use such couplers. I will post some pictures later. This week we will be lifting some heavy machinery to move it (80,000 lbs) and these cylinders will hopefully be helpful.
i
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On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 17:32:18 -0500, Ignoramus24752

Wasn't the recip saw a lot quicker? That thing must take a minute or more to cycle, huh? Nice, though! Was it expensive?
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The pump was $100 on craigslist, the head about $130. Sawzall alone would not do it. My guy also used a circular saw with 60 tooth blade.
i
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On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 02:28:16 -0500, Ignoramus24752

Not bad at all. Is the head for copper only, or will it do wire rope?

One row at a time, I'm guessing?
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Copper wire only, no steel.

Right!
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Still pretty good. Copper has been pretty flat for the last 1.5 years or so.

I want to cut it to remove steel ends, and secondly to clean off the urethane foam.

White gunk is expanding urethane foam, it does not seem to stick to copper very well and should easily come off once the coil is cut.
i
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On Sun, 09 Apr 2017 08:51:14 -0500, Ignoramus14657

It has been awhile since I looked.

Recip saws are nice for demo work. I bought a nice, heavy duty Porter Cable Tiger Saw years ago. It's a heavy beast, too. You can also set one up in a vise and use it to hack off the thicker urethane, not having to worry about scraping the surface. They're a bit safer than circular and band saws. I bought a
The little 18v Ryobi is much lighter.

Oh, God. That shit is nearly invulnerable to solvents. Acetone works when it's fresh, but nothing cuts it when it's dry/cured. And it doesn't burn off cleanly, producing toxic gases if you try.
I suggest you build a multiple brush unit to run it through to clean off that foam. And ask your scrap guys what they consider "clean", so you're not surprised when you take it in to redeem it.
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    Ugly!

    How long is the coil?
    And what about the radial thickness?
    Do you have a portable bandsaw? That might bridge the radial thickness. Are you cutting it in place, or can you bring it to your place first?
    Maybe a low speed circular saw with a zero rake blade. Anything with a rake will probably dig in. A pity the coil is not open enough to use tubing cutters on it.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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Not sure how long, it is very hard to unroll. I tried, as you see, with big forklifts, but it was very difficult.

Each tubing is over an inch thick, heavy, and inside this tube there is a smaller tube, as this is a heat exchanger.

It is at my place.

I bought a 60 tooth circular saw blade for "non-ferrous". I will give it a try.
i
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2017 22:07:22 -0500, Ignoramus9502

Sawz-All
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