Re: Times change - A new way to cut steel

Who makes a good powerful 7-1/4" worm drive circular saw these days?
One that could hold up to metal cutting use. Porter-Cable, Bosch,
Skil, Milwaukee?
Thanks!!!>This may be old news to a few, but I know that most metal workers have
never used a dry cut carbide saw to cut steel.
>
>The 14" saws have been out for 3 years now and I have had one for 2 >years.
>They are amazing, but now they have a cousin that is equally mind >boggling.
>
>7-1/4" steel cutting saw blades that fit on standard worm drive saws. >
>MK Morse makes the Metal Devil blades
>
>
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>Tenryu makes the Steel-Pro blades
>
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>and Matsushita makes these metal cutting blades
>
>g-carbide-tipped-blades.html>
>
>There is a dedicated steel cutting hand held circular saw made in
>England and sold in the US by Jancy and MK Morse.
>It is called the Evolution saw.
>
>
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>The 7" saw runs around $300, and the 9" saw (which even does miters) is >closer to $500.
>
>A lot of the local welding stores and tool stores have tried selling
>the Evolution saws, but they are just too expensive and few stores feel
>like sitting on the inventory.
>I guess they will remain a custom order item.
>
>Some day I will own one of the 9" saws.
>I got to use one at an open house at a welding store.
>Absolutely amazing.
>
>Anyway I recently got to try a 7-1/4" Tenryu Steelpro blade in a
>standard skilsaw.
>I bought the blade over a year ago to cut bronze sheet, but I had never
>used it on steel.
>It made angled trim cuts on 2" x 12" x 3/16"wall steel tubing in a
>matter of minutes, for steel stair runners.
>
>However my standard skilsaw really didn't like the abuse, and all the
>bronze I had cut had popped a few teeth.
>So this last weekend I decided to hit the fleamarket for a Skil
>wormdrive.
>I found one for $30 in very good condition.
>Just as I left the flea market I noticed that the Tool Town store
>across the street was open, so I stopped in to see if they had a Tenryu >steelpro blade.
>They did have the 7-1/4" Tenryu for $50, but they also had the
>Matsushita version for $40, so I bought one and stuck it on the saw. >
>I got home and promptly sliced the end off of a piece of 1/2" x 12" >plate steel.
>
>We are talking clean cut, no heat and no burr.
>
>Tonight I was dicing up 3/8" x 6" flat bar for some base flanges, and
>trimming off the corners.
>The saw just slides through the steel, as if it was nothing more than >hard pine.
>
>If you have a worm drive, it is well worth the investment in the blade.
>The saw barely seems to notice that it is cutting steel.
>
>I do recommend that when using one of these blades in a standard worm
>drive, that you use complete safety gear.
>Head cover, safety glasses, full face shield and ear muffs.
>The chips that fly off this thing tend to ricochet around a little and
>they are quite hot.
>
>Using a piece of bar as a cutting guide gives straighter cuts.
>
>Try it, you'll like it.
Reply to
zerospam
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The Skil 77 is still one of the best on the market. Milwaukee also makes a decent worm drive. I think the Makita could take it as well.
I would skip dewalt, too much plastic. Don't know anything about Porter Cable worm drives.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I sure wish I had read the original post. I just came in from torching and grinding 20 pieces of 1/4" plate. I even have a Skill 77 sitting in the shop that I haven't used in years.
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
We have a Jansey at work that we use for cutting bar grating and heavy expanded...also buzzes right thru 5/8 alum. with a blade designed to cut alum. Had to rework the guide on it though as it was not very accurate in relation to the blade location. It has a cavity where a majority of the chips collect but it fills up fast and is a mess to clean out. I think we bought it about 2 years ago and the price has dropped about 200 bucks since
Reply to
Doobie
Porter Cable makes a really nice 4" worm drive Trim saw for about $225-$250. Don't know how it would do for cutting metal. Their bigger worm drives should hold up to what you wanr to do though.
Dick Steflik
Doobie wrote:
Reply to
Dick Steflik
The blades are great, Horibull Fright now sells a saw for metal cutting, item 8897-0VGA
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the blades cost $40 minimum, may not be that bad a deal. I've had one for a while now, still am impressed with the performance. The saw I use is a $5 garage sale special Black & Decker 2 1/3 hp 10A 5300 rpm nothing special saw, probably cost $29.99 10 years ago when new. I'm not sure of the service life of the blade, I'm sure that it depends, as with all cutting tools, on the type of material being cut, the machine you are driving the cutter with, the rigidity of the setup, the position of the moon, etc., etc. I made a cut in 1.25 inch thick A36 in 95 seconds. That's for a 7 inch long cut. I made a pass thru 12" of this same 1.25" plate with an abrasive saw in about 95 minutes, about half of the time being spent letting the saw and material cool down. Don't get me wrong, I think the abrasive saw blades work great, and I still think they have their place, probably with softer materials, or with materials that cannot be secured to give a chatter free cut. I spent about $45for this saw blade at Tool Town (for those of you in the Seattle area), and that is too much in some respects, but I won't be coughing and blowing abrasive boogers anymore and that is something I do like.
FYI, was cutting some 3/16 304 SS that I got at Pacific Iron and it does throw some pretty good sparks. Maybe not the right geometry for SS????
Reply to
nic
Stainless steel is brutal to dry-cut saws. I often use abrasive wheels on stainless because of how fast it dulls my dry-cut blades.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Angle iron from bed frames is terrible too.
Reply to
Zorro
What is the recommended depth adjustment for metal cutting blades? Just barely deep enough to completly penetrate or set the saw for as deep as possible? For sheet metal I was thinking fairly shallow, and for thicker plate set the it up more like a dry cut saw--straight in towards the axis.

Cheers!
Reply to
Maurice
Because that is hardened and tempered spring steel. Makes good chisels though.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
That is about right. On plate you always want to cut through the thinnest section.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Stainless should not be machined with C-5 or C-6 carbide, which is likely near the grade of carbide used in steel cutting blades. Those grades don't hold up any better on a lathe or mill when used on stainless. While it is, in general, a pain to machine, I'm of the opinion that a blade made with a C-2 grade would cut stainless quite well. For sure it makes a big difference when machining. Interestingly, the C-5 or C-6 carbide used on stainless appears to dull prematurely, just as you suggest it does when sawing.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

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