Pneumatic Cylinder Pressure

Hi Guys (and Gals!),
I was wondering if anyone knew the answer to this:
Is the force exerted by two cylinders different depending on where a COMMON
air feed line is placed? In pictorial form:
Configuration 1:
Air In ---------[]-----------[]
Configuration 2:
Air In --------- | []-------------------------[]
In the first configuration, the air line feeds one cylinder, which tees off and then feeds another cylinder. In the second configuration, the air line feeds a tee which goes to each cylinder.
Would they exert different effective forces given the air in has the same psi?
Thanks!!
Adrian
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The center feed can be essential on systems where the 2 cylinders act on one piece of equipment and need to receive similar air pressure at all times. In configuration 1, the left cylinder will receive more pressure than the right cylinder due to line losses, unless the line size is large enough to reduce the velocity of the air.
wrote:

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Dear Adrian:

COMMON
off
line
While moving, yes. If there are significant air leaks in the "close" cylinder, yes. When the cylinders are not moving and the air is stagnant, no.
David A. Smith
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Essentially no. I've seen config 1 in use but I don't know why it was done that way. It may have been only to save a fitting or a piece of tubing. It kind of had me puzzled for a bit. There may be some short term differences but in the end it doesn't matter.
Walter.

COMMON
off
line
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Dear Walter Driedger:

done
It
differences
You can get a primitive form of sequencing out of that arrangement. One cylinder goes most of the way out, while the distant cylinder basically just loads the mechanism.
Most of the time it just saves tubing, and one fitting (if you do it "right").
David A. Smith
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Thanks everyone for all the VERY helpful replies!!
Adrian

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Yes, but in the case I saw the two cylinders were linked to the same scotch yoke and had to move in exact synchronization.
Walter.

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You will have the same resultent force on both cylinders (with or without a leak) but the timing on the extend or retract will be different depending on where the "T" is placed snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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