Here we go again: PVC PIPE FOR AIR SUPPLY LINES

Due to having no money and abundance of devil-may-care, I am thinking of using P.V.C. pipe to put in my shop for air supply. I am thinking
of using 1/2 inch due the the highest pressure rating compared to larger sizes.
Now, my thought is to buy some wire cloth - the stuff that has open squares of ~ .5 inch and cut it where, when formed into a tube, it would cover the p.v.c. pipe comfortably.
Should the pipe explode due to the air pressure, the wire-cloth should stop large pieces from becoming killer pieces.
I expect the nay sayers to say: DON'T DO IT, YOU WILL BE KILLED. To them I say: I don't expect to eliminate ALL CHANCES OF DEATH OR INJURY BUT I DO EXPECT THE SHIELDING TO CALM MY FEARS RATHER THAN USING BARE PIPE.
What say?
Thanks
Joe
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Just use rubber hoses, what's the problem.
i

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Cost, Iggy.
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 20:53:25 -0600, Ignoramus8003

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Cost of rubber hoses? You gotta be kidding me, they are very cheap.
i

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On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 20:53:25 -0600, Ignoramus8003

I like the mesh reinforced vinyl tubing myself Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Easy and safe and cheap.
i
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wrote:

Or the polypropylene or whatever it is black reticulation pipe - the heavier stuff used commercially or on farms.
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wrote:

I haven't run into that yet, but I am a newby to compressed air, only had a compressor for about 4 years and just learning what I've been missing, dammit! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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The Parker Store clerk sold me some reinforced clear tubing for the return line on my hydraulic loader. Six years later it's still flexible. https://picasaweb.google.com/KB1DAL/HomeMadeMachines#5108217038161999810 It may have been real Tygon which doesn't need soluble plasticizers to remain flexible. http://www.tygon.com/tygon-tubing.aspx
jsw
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On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 23:22:30 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The reason pros use them is they pack more power into a smaller lighter unit, good ones last forever, there is NO shock hazard, and no spark hazard when working around fuel vapours etc.
You can have my air impact when you can pry it out od my cold dead hands - along with my air ratchet and drill.
The electric impact? I returned it after the first time I tried to use it . total waste of money and effort.
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I have a 3/4" electric impact, that works very well. Took off forklift wheel nuts very quickly.
i
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On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 16:54:23 -0600, Ignoramus32097

and 3 times as heavy as a good air operated one.
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YES, but it does not need a compressor.
i
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wrote:

Did you add in the weight of the coal fired generator, or the nuke??
I don't carry the compresser around - just string out the hose.

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wrote:

Lots of service trucks have either self contained or engine mounted compressors to allow use of air tools "in the field"
And CO2 tanks are a lot less bulky, and a lot lighter, than a generator (or compressor) for "limited" field use.
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wrote:

If you use polyethelyne pipe, it not fail in a brittle manner. It may eventually burst, but all it will dammage is your composure. It will not scatter shrapnel around.
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On 11/22/2011 6:49 PM, justme wrote:

I have had PVC air line in my business for 12 years. Runs 125 psi all day, 5 days a week. We have never had a break. Scared me to death, but my late partner had it installed before I was part of the company.
Almost all the pipes lower than 20 ft are steel, however, and all I have put in are steel.
The more immediate and lasting problem is sag in the horizontal PVC distribution lines. Moisture collects there until there is a big release of air further down the line and then liquid comes out the end. The PVC could not be placed so there was a continuous slope downward.
We have filters and a refrigerated air dryer in the line and that is a late addition. Most of the water vapor doesn't make it to the PVC, now.
Paul
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Thanks, Paul.
I feel better. What size are the pipes?
Joe
On Tue, 22 Nov 2011 19:23:00 -0800, Paul Drahn

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On 11/22/2011 7:39 PM, justme wrote:

They are 1/2", Joe.
Just wait 12 hours or so after gluing sections, before applying air pressure.
Paul
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If you can afford PVC Pipe and fittings, you can afford cheap imported Black Iron (really steel) pipe - they sell a lot of it for natural gas lines. Take the time to do it right, or don't bother and get lots of hoses.
They have the plastic coated rust resistant stuff too if you need to bury an air feed between the garage and house - coat the fitting with sealant, then wrap the fittings in the special tape and slather another coat of sealant over the tape to keep the water out.
Do Not use Galvanized pipe, the zinc flakes off and gets into the tools and valves.
And your 'Wrap chicken wire around the PVC " plan is doomed for failure - there is a LOT of captive energy there...
Run the riser up to the rafters from the compressor and refrigerated dryer or aftercooler, then when it changes to horizontal to head off into the shop leave a slight downhill - maybe 1/4" per 10' to the far end of the room - where you put an elbow and a drain leg down to a drain valve you can reach. Drain it every few weeks - you'll be shocked how much water coalesces out in the lines.
Do NOT buy lots of couplings - buy mostly Tees and Plugs, and put a tee every length of pipe with the third hole POINTED UP to the roof - when you realize you need a new drop there, you just pull the threaded pipe plug out of the tee and go.
If you plan to wait 20 years and then add a new drop by cutting the Black pipe and threading it for a new tee, FUHGEDDABOUDIT. You'll either snap off an old fitting, or twist the old connections and create a dozen leaks... And eventually between the hissing leaks and compressor cycling every fifteen minutes it will drive you mad, and you have to take The Whole Damn System Apart and start over.
The tap legs go UP from the main line for a few inches so if there is any moisture in the air you leave it trapped in the main line - and eventually it'll work it's way to that drain leg at the far end. Then you go horizontal over to the wall, and drop down to your drop fittings.
Oh, and put another tee there with another butterfly drain valve on the drip-leg, so if any water gets that far it's stopped again. Water in your air is bad news.
If you have the money you use Copper pipe - but you build it the exact same way with the drip legs everywhere, and up-legs to leave the water behind. Except you can skip the tees, it's easy enough to cut in one and solder or braze the tap tee as needed. (No threading in place.)
I use Silver Braze on Copper for Air (or refrigerant) - that way your Plumber doesn't think it's a Water line he can tap into. Which can get exciting.
--<< Bruce >>--
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