Copper for air lines?

Do any of you use 10mm copper pipe to run compressed air around your workshop?
I was surprised to hear of someone doing this using 10mm copper "small
bore" heating pipe. I've always thought 'air lines' were iron or steel pipes.
He limited to, as I recall, 160 PSI.
Not something I'm planning on doing, the only use my compressor sees is tyre inflation and the air wrench, I'm simply curious.
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One problem with 10 mm bore pipe would be lack of flow so air tools wouldn't run well, usual max pressure would be 80 psi so well in spec, he must have had copper available and use it.
Martin P

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"Brian Reay" wrote in message

At my last place I had several drops in 15mm copper where it was convenient, though most was blue 20mm mdpe. Here I have an extensive network of 25mm mdpe which, as I was starting again, was able to lay it out in a more satisfactory manner. Including the runs between buildings I've probably got something approaching 100 metres of the stuff, which provides a significant reservoir of air. My hydrovane is in a Portakabin remote from any of the workshops, which is handy for keeping the noise down.
AWEM
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On 15/09/13 13:58, Andrew Mawson wrote:

Thank you Andrew and Martin for your responses.
I'm even more surprised to learn you can use 'plastic' pipe for fixed installations. I suppose I had only seen iron/steel and assumed that was the requirement but it was simply a historical thing.
Should I ever decide to install a fixed air line, I will take what has been said into account.
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Brian,
Plastic pipe is becoming very common in industry its also very easy to install as you now have push in fittings which dont require tools to assemble.
Martin P


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On 15/09/13 15:07, Brian Reay wrote:

Should you go the copper/copper alloy route, consider joining the lengths by butt-jointing and welding/brazing with Silbralloy. With copper or high-copper content pipe, no flux is required.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.
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Brian
If you decide to install an airline 'ring' its worth looking at Toolstation s's website. They have a selection of push together plastic compressed air pipe and fittings, and they deliver foc!
No connection etc
John H
On Sunday, September 15, 2013 11:17:22 AM UTC+1, Brian Reay wrote:

shop? I was surprised to hear of someone doing this using 10mm copper "smal l bore" heating pipe. I've always thought 'air lines' were iron or steel pi pes. He limited to, as I recall, 160 PSI. Not something I'm planning on doi ng, the only use my compressor sees is tyre inflation and the air wrench, I 'm simply curious.
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On 15/09/13 21:21, John H wrote:

Thank you John.
I will keep it in mind, should I ever have need. However, the question was prompted by curiosity- something I heard on an amateur radio discussion on 80m the other evening. I've no need for air tools on my bench, my compressor is only used for tyres (higher pressure than normal forecourt lines) and an air wrench from time to time.
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On 15/09/13 21:21, John H wrote:

Interesting but what pressure is that stuff rated for. I noted that they didn't give that information for any part of the system that I could see.
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David
The pipes etc are made by John Guest who make plastic water pipes etc. (Whi ch IMO are the greatest improvement in domestic water systems.) Have a look at http://www.johnguest.com/Home/applications/air-and-pneumatics/Air/Acces sories/RIGID-NYLON-PIPE.aspx Max working pressure of 28 bar should be good enough for most applications!
John H
On Monday, September 16, 2013 12:44:46 AM UTC+1, David Billington wrote:

airline 'ring' its worth looking at Toolstations's website. They have a sel ection of push together plastic compressed air pipe and fittings, and they deliver foc! > > No connection etc > > John H > > On Sunday, September 15, 2013 11:17:22 AM UTC+1, Brian Reay wrote: >> Do any of you use 10mm copper pipe to run compressed air around your workshop? I was surprised to hear of someone doing this using 10mm copper "small bore" heating pipe. I've alway s thought 'air lines' were iron or steel pipes. He limited to, as I recall, 160 PSI. Not something I'm planning on doing, the only use my compressor s ees is tyre inflation and the air wrench, I'm simply curious. Interesting b ut what pressure is that stuff rated for. I noted that they didn't give tha t information for any part of the system that I could see.
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On 16/09/13 23:15, John H wrote:

John,
Thanks but that is the maximum for 18mm at 20C and I note on the page that they have this disclaimer "John Guest fittings are typically rated at maximum 10 bar pressure which is below that of nylon pipe." .
I think I may stick with steel pipe and iron fittings for the time being as I have the threading and bending equipment for the pipe.

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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 00:29:44 +0100, David Billington

<SNIP> Greetings from the other side of the pond. I have been reading this thread and thought I would put my two cents in. Several years ago I had to re-plumb the shop I worked in with new plastic pipe made for the purpose. And I learned that you want to use the largest diameter and lowest pressure you can live with. When the pressure drops in the pipe any water in the air will tend to drop out and settle on the bottom. Small diameter pipe with high pressure will cause a larger pressure drop and so more water will condense out. Furthermore, the smaller pipe causes higher air velocity which tends to drag the water off the bottom of the pipe and it then becomes entrained in the air. So the large pipe is best, all the air taps should come from the top of the pipe, the runs should be sloped in the opposite direction of air flow, and there should be drops at the low points in the runs to drain water from the system. Since the area of the pipe cross section changes with the square of the radius a small diameter change can have large consequences. After I re-did the air plumbing we had much drier air which is good for machines and air tools. The original pipe was PVC and it was old enough that it started to explode. Whole 10 or 12 foot long sections of pipe would just turn into shrapnel. Eric, from Whidbey Island, 30 miles or so north of Seattle
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wrote in message wrote:

MDPE pipe is the stuff to use. Definitely avoid PVC.
AWEM
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On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 20:43:58 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"

The pipe I used was some type of modified ABS, specifically made for air lines and quite expensive. MDPE is way cheaper. In fact, if I add any new air lines to my shop it will be MDPE. Lots easier to make long runs too. And no gluing. Eric
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