springing copper pipe

I have just replumbed kitchen and the two kitchen sink taps are very
awkwardly placed for a straight connection to existing 15mm copper pipework.
I could use some solder ring fittings and make connections that way but i
would prefer as few joints as possible (less chance leaks).
Is there an easy way to shape copper pipe like pro plumbers seem to be able
to do without much difficulty or do i just fit couple of flexible tap
connectors.
Reply to
gamemaniak
Loading thread data ...
You might try buying copper tubing in a roll instead of copper pipe. It is sold/supplied in a very annealed state and very easy to bend by hand. Maybe even too easy!
The problem that supply tubes correct is not so much off-alignment, but to adapt to the correct "distance" when the fixture and the existing supply don't have movement or a union to allow a joint. The problem they create is loss of ID and therefore restrict flow somewhat.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson
You can buy/hire/borrow/steal a pipe bender. I have used flexible connector pipes. They come with either compression or push on ends. Both work well.
John
Reply to
John Manders
Without being able to see the existing situation, I would clean the ends of the copper well, install a compression fitting valve, then install a flexible supply line up to the faucet stubs and be done with it. Ken.
Reply to
Kenneth W. Sterling
Having just fitted a new kitchen faucet set recently, I can empathize. Old plumbing is a pain and hooking it up to new stuff even more so. Most new faucet sets I've seen lately have plastic flex to connect to the supply, you get to select the means. This one had iron pipe up to a couple of feet below the old faucet set, then changed to rigid copper pipe and solder fittings to the faucets. The adapter wasn't at a good spot to get at it, so I chose to leave a stub length of copper there, soldered a threaded adapter on and screwed a stainless steel ball valve onto it for a shutoff. The plastic flex adapter threaded right into it and the faucet flex went onto that. I repeated the performance for the other line at a slightly different height so the valve handles would clear each other and it was done, no leaks. Plastic flex is your friend, don't fight it. If you ever have to remove the sink or replace the counter top, it's dead easy to get apart, too.
If you still want to do the old-timey plumber imitation, go get some flexible copper tubing, not rigid pipe. You can bend that with a spring bender, or rather, a bending spring, to keep it from collapsing. A good hardware store should have them.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
All you have to do to shape conventional copper water pipe is anneal it first. Get the pipe hot (near red heat) and quench, or simply allow it to air cool. You'll find it bends very nicely after the annealing process. Copper pipe is work hardened from the manufacturing process, thus is very rigid. The alternative is as has already been suggested, to buy coiled copper tubing, which is already annealed.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Actually, bendable tubing is more rigid, strictly speaking. It has a thicker wall - but being annealed, is easy to bend. Annealing and bending rigid tubing is dubious because of its thinner wall. FYI.
Tim
-- "That's for the courts to decide." - Homer Simpson Website @
formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams
Depends on the tubing and the pipe being compared. Your statement is not true across the board. Hard copper pipe is available in three wall thicknesses, K (thin), L , and M (heavier). Wall thickness, in general, depends on the size of the tubing (pipe). Likewise, coiled copper tubing is available in various wall thicknesses. Bending hard copper pipe, once annealed, is a piece of cake. Been there, done that, in both K and L pipe. That was a lesson learned from a very close friend, who worked as a plumber until he retired. The one big difference is the pipe is discolored from heating, but otherwise behaves as well as coiled annealed tubing.
Remember, when going from pipe to tubing, sizes are not identical. Tubing is measured by the OD, pipe is measured by the ID, so ½" copper pipe is the same size as 5/8" tubing. When it gets to pipe of large diameter, the game rules change again. At 14" and above, pipe is measured by the OD. Confusing, yes?
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
IOW, it's a generalization.. ;) I heard that typical bendable tubing comes thicker (L/M?) than rigid, like say you were to go to Ace Hardware or Home Despot.
Hmmm, I'll have to remember that if I ever have to do a quick job of bending some pipe then. Bring the pickle in case anyone is picky. ;)
Tim
-- "That's for the courts to decide." - Homer Simpson Website @
formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.