Copper pipe chopping

Copper pipes have different scrap values, depending on whether there
are soldered joints, or not.
I sometimes come across copper pipes that have good non-soldered
sections and some soldered sections. I would like to separate soldered
from non-soldered sections cheaply.
Bandsawing that stuff is 1) wasteful and 2) expensive due to labor
cost.
To that end, I want to make a copper pipe chopper that would be used
with my hydraulic press shown here:
formatting link

So, I want to build something that would be press-powered and cut
copper only (no hard metals).
My question is what is the best design and do I need special steel for
blades or regular steel will suffice?
The diameter should be up to 4 inches capacity.
Thanks
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19161
Loading thread data ...
Ignoramus19161 fired this volley in news:ptWdnYB6b8mAq6LOnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Ig, if crushing the pipe isn't an issue (didn't figure it would be for scrap) get thyself a log splitter wedge. It's good tough steel, will keep a sharp edge for a while, and is almost always weldable (and re- sharpenable).
That on a platen softer than the wedge but harder than the copper should do the trick.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
A friend uses a big old paper guillotine [no guard fitted] for exactly this job. Cuts copper like butter.
JB
Reply to
JB
It seems like you want to take the workpiece to the press? I'd rather use a simple pipe cutter (tool that looks like a C-clamp, with rotating cutterwheel). They come in all sizes, including some that work well in crowded spots.
It isn't much work to make a cut- no powertool safety issues.
Reply to
whit3rd
I know you just want another project to keep you busy, Ig, but why don't you use a multi-disced pipe cutter? They're FAST!
formatting link
1/2 to 2-1/2", and 2-1/2-4" models are available. $50-60 eBay
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Not an issue
OK, looks like a fun, easy project and the result will be safe to use.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19161
A sharp axe and a hardwood chopping block would work. I have cut up aluminium screen door sections this way to make thm more convenient to handle.
Reply to
geraldrmiller
How about a "Lopper" mini chainsaw?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Just an idea - my local scrappy has what looks like a large set of bench shears that are hydraulically driven. He cuts aluminium extrusions, heavy cable, pipe, just about anything with it.
Reply to
Belleman
Yes, this is exactly what I want!!!
i
Reply to
Ignoramus10660
The guys I sell scrap to use one like this, only smaller.

Reply to
Belleman
I saw something which would do the job for you at a hamfest today (well ... yesterday by now.
It was a service kit for some kind of "Jaws Of Life" setup. I forget the actual name. It had an arc shaped anvil, and a blade like about 1/3 of a disc (blued steel, and getting thicker towards the cylinder), and it was driven by a hydraulic cylinder. It was quite hefty.
It looks like it would be quite comfortable with 4" diameter copper. I didn't price it, nor do I remember who was selling it, but you might look for something like this.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Snip..
Will your scarp metal dealer trust you with the ends of the pipe crimped? One could hide a length of rebar inside.
Reply to
Boris Mohar
Yeah, they're quick, but Ig doesn't want to waste a few ounces of copper each cut on large pipe. It adds up after filling a truck with cut pieces. Plus, catching all the filings is damned frustrating and time consuming. I'd want the same thing if I had lots of scrap.
He can build a portable alligator-jawed press quickly and cheaply, if he can't find a used one for a song.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I can always ask my chopping guy to open up the ends, with the same chopping press, just press down at 90 degrees less than fully cutting, they will open. Scrap dealers around here are very smart and not easy to cheat.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30810
It is both, time, an copper sawdust, that I want to save.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30810
Someone else suggested using the ram from a log splitter - why not just scrounge a complete log splitter?
----- Regards, Carl Ijames
It is both, time, an copper sawdust, that I want to save.
i
Reply to
Carl Ijames
Yabbut, you lose half of it down the tubes, which aren't always easy to tilt into the box. OK, it's doable but not worth the hassle.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Larry Jaques on Sun, 06 Apr 2014 22:16:28 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
As my boss would say on occasion, you're trying to pick the fly shit out of the pepper. Unless the copper sawdust is going to be a major fraction of the total copper (I.e., you have a very small amount of copper pipe), you are intending to spend a lot of time to save fractions of a penny. But if that is your intent, then it is time to get out the pipe cutter, and just spin it round and round and round. If you think that your time is more valuable - hire someone else to do that. Or get the sawzall, and just saw the pipe up. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I certainly see Ig's points. By cutting it cleanly:
Waste is eliminated. Time is saved. Cleanup is eliminated, or drastically diminished.
Triple win. Plus, with a fast-acting shear, it could be even faster. Weld/bolt a hook onto the end of the cutter, or use a toothed cutter to keep the pipe in the machine as it shears.
Reply to
Larry Jaques

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.