208 Volt Transformers

I looked on line for 208 volt trasformers, but have not found much.
Looking for a multitap 208 in 280 out transformer at about 120A so you can
make adjustments for low line voltage.
Also need a 208 in 120 out transformer at about 30A.
Can anyone point me in the right direction?
Thanks
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on the 208 in 120 out about any 240 to 240 volt isolation transformer will work. The primary and secondary windings are usually split so that you can parallel or series them to make a 240V to 120V. With taps (which most have) you can get 208 to 120v. Cutler hammer, square d, etc.
Charles
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

can
can
have)
Do a bit of shopping on Ebay, as you can typically pick up a dry transformer in serviceable condition for 10-20 cents on the dollar. I even done oddball stuff, like trying to get 380VAC (Japanese industrial spec) from 208 by reversing a common 460 to 230VAC step down transformer and trying out various combinations of taps. I was able to accomplish for a couple of hundred bucks what would have been about $2500 for a specially wound custom job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The reason you will not find too many online is simple. The shipping would be outrageously high.
Buy it through a contractor and pay the markup. You won't find them at Home Depot. I can help you if you have no luck.
AEC Electric & Controls Michael R snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobalremovethiscrap.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These are single phase transformers you need?
Do you mean 208 in, 208 out? Maybe 240:240 45kVA would work OK for that.
Are you sure you need a transformer to get 120V from 208V, maybe you just need a neutral?
You could try giving some details of your existing service / distribution system and what you are trying to accomplish, might be worthwhile.
j
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, I'm not and expert on this subject, but here is what I'm trying to do.
I have an input voltage of 208V. It is two phases of a 3-phase circuit and a neutral. I want to convert this to 120v and only need about 4KVA
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
www.AEControlsInc.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have two phases of three phase 208V and a neutral, then you already have 120V. Either line to neutral will be 120V. Ideally you would split the load up, 2 kVA from one hot phase to neutral, and 2 kVA from the other hot phase to neutral. Load on either phase would be 2000VA/120VA. I would recommend separate neutrals for each phase unless the load is only incandescent lighting or resistance heating. You could use a single hot line to neutral, the load would then be about 4000VA/120V4A, the neutral would carry the same amount of current. What is your 4kVA, 120V load? You might be best to find an engineer and/or electrician depending on what you're up to.
j
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Acme makes both xformers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.