dangerous student electricity project?

My son needs me to help him with a school project--a simple circuit with a switch. He said he wants to use a light bulb, a switch, and
have it plug into the wall. Is this inherently dangerous? BTW, he's in 9th grade and says he saw a setup like this on the teacher's desk. Thanks.
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Bayou Self wrote:

Dear heavens, of course it's dangerous...it's the very same sort of electricity they use in electric chairs, after all. Wouldn't your son's school project be much safer if he just devised an interpretive dance expressing his disgust at the raping of Mother Gaia by greedy capitalism?
Bill
( who by modern standards shouldn't have made it past his 10th birthday...but I was an unusually cautious child for my era.)
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wrote:

Maybe he should build an electric chair instead!

I got zapped by a 10kV Jacob's ladder at ten y.o.a.. I guess you are all lucky I survived the event.
When I say "I am the sanest person in the shop" at work, and my head jerks, it isn't fake. :-]
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On 12/8/07 5:33 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@q3g2000hsg.googlegroups.com, "Bayou

Of course it is dangerous, but not overly so. Life is dangerous. Riding in cars is dangerous. Working underneath cars is dangerous. Working on something like that will teach him to be careful. I was working on such "dangerous" things when I was in high school.
If you want to greatly increase safety, although not completely eliminate it, use a GFCI extension cord. GFCI stands for ground fault circuit interrupter. These are readily available at many hardware stores.
Bill
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wrote:

To increase the effectiveness of the GFI I suggest the student splash salt water on the concrete floor and stand barefooted in it. Otherwise I suggest you leave the GFI at the HomeDepot. Chuck
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Chuck wrote:

Some people won't have enough of a sense of humor to laugh at your joke - or even recognize that is what it is. I suppose, since it concerns safety, that they are right. Also, there are those who have no clue about how a GFCI works or the safety benefit it can provide, so they might actually believe what you posted.
It is probably wiser not to joke about safety, and it is definitely wiser to use the GFCI as Bill recommended.
Ed
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Why not use a lantern battery? You can get the battery, a knife switch and a small low voltage bulb and ceramic screw socket from ACE hardware. The parts are in the pull out bins where small parts and fasners are located.
My son did an electrical project (a coil gun) and we had to go through hoops to convince the school that it was safe.
Bayou Self wrote:

--
Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"
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snipped-for-privacy@nettally.com says...

I built a Tesla coil with the primary fired by an oil furnace ignition transformer and miscellaneous junk, for a high school science project. I never did get them to believe that it was safe. Schools weren't the trusting sort even thirty-something years before DHS. ;-)
--
Keith

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I had a Jr High Sch "science" project that was a transformer, a switch, and a battery with two electrodes coming off the transformer.
I called it a "Lie Detector". You wouldn't believe the number of "takers" I had.
Someone would tell me their age, and I would jolt them and say, the box says you lie, smiling. He replies, "but I am not lying." I laugh a bit, and say "The box does not lie."
Quite the bit of science, that was. I should have gone with a Tesla coil or Jacob's ladder.
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says...

I would plug the setup into a plug strip with a breaker built in to it...
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No, I don't think its really dangerous, considering for a 9th grade student. He can easily do it Make sure neither of you touch the live copper wire or insert any material(like stick, knife, screw driver) into the plug point. First do all the circuit connections and then connect the circuit to supply. This will take all the gaurd necessary.
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Bayou Self wrote:

Make the 'plug' a low voltage wall wart and there shouldn't be a problem. I'm thinking 12V max.
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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Assuming no exposed conductors, what is being built is basicly a lamp fixture. Perhaps something at this site will insipre a project: http://www.emeritbadges.org/classes/Electricity2stud.ppt

Of course, but so is riding a school bus.
BTW, he's in

Before grade 6 I installed lights and motors in a "time machine" a prop for a play I build out of a cardboard supermarket display.
By 12th grade I was already troubleshooting AC systems and installing AC outlets and lighting including bending conduit.
Your best help would be to refer your son to someone qualified to help him if you know what I mean.
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wrote:

Better off using a DC light bulb socket, bulb, and a switch.
Yes, AC can be dangerous. If there are any exposed contacts, then the AC will be available for human contact, and that is a bad thing.
With low voltage DC, the most that can happen would be a hot wire causing a burn in the event of a short.Not really much else could happen.
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wrote:
| wrote: | |>My son needs me to help him with a school project--a simple circuit |>with a switch. He said he wants to use a light bulb, a switch, and |>have it plug into the wall. Is this inherently dangerous? BTW, he's in |>9th grade and says he saw a setup like this on the teacher's desk. |>Thanks. | | | Better off using a DC light bulb socket, bulb, and a switch. | | Yes, AC can be dangerous. If there are any exposed contacts, then the | AC will be available for human contact, and that is a bad thing.
So 120VDC is safe?
| With low voltage DC, the most that can happen would be a hot wire | causing a burn in the event of a short.Not really much else could happen.
So 12VAC is dangerous?
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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On 9 Dec 2007 17:20:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

Show me where I ever said anything about 120V DC, or for that matter, show me where ANYONE in industry, much less consumer electronics, or home improvement uses 120V DC.

You could be a little more retarded, just not today.
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wrote: | On 9 Dec 2007 17:20:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote: | |>On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 00:02:25 -0800 ChairmanOfTheBored
|>| wrote: |>| |>|>My son needs me to help him with a school project--a simple circuit |>|>with a switch. He said he wants to use a light bulb, a switch, and |>|>have it plug into the wall. Is this inherently dangerous? BTW, he's in |>|>9th grade and says he saw a setup like this on the teacher's desk. |>|>Thanks. |>| |>| |>| Better off using a DC light bulb socket, bulb, and a switch. |>| |>| Yes, AC can be dangerous. If there are any exposed contacts, then the |>| AC will be available for human contact, and that is a bad thing. |> |>So 120VDC is safe? | | Show me where I ever said anything about 120V DC, or for that matter, | show me where ANYONE in industry, much less consumer electronics, or home | improvement uses 120V DC.
Read the quoted text. It's saying something is dangerous because of the nature of the electrical system, rather than it's voltage level. I brought up 120VDC to show the misdirected statement about danger.
|>| With low voltage DC, the most that can happen would be a hot wire |>| causing a burn in the event of a short.Not really much else could happen. |> |>So 12VAC is dangerous? | | You could be a little more retarded, just not today.
So why did you say "DC"? Why not just say "With low voltage, the most that can happen would be a hot wire causing a burn in the event of a short. Not really much else could happen."
Your incomplete and off-target statements can be misleading.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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On 10 Dec 2007 01:13:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

He said "...have it plug into the wall. Is this inherently dangerous?" and the answer is yes. The reason is voltage. The location and action of plugging it into the wall IS the declaration of voltage and the introduction of the danger if there are exposed nodes and conductors..
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wrote: | On 10 Dec 2007 01:13:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote: | |>Read the quoted text. It's saying something is dangerous because of the |>nature of the electrical system, rather than it's voltage level. I brought |>up 120VDC to show the misdirected statement about danger. | | | He said "...have it plug into the wall. Is this inherently dangerous?" | and the answer is yes. The reason is voltage. The location and action | of plugging it into the wall IS the declaration of voltage and the | introduction of the danger if there are exposed nodes and conductors..
What you said earlier is:

The first 2 paragraphs of that are what are in error. The 3rd is even a bit misleading. They should have been something like:
* Better off using a low voltage light bulb socket, bulb, and a switch. * * Yes, high voltage can be dangerous. If there are any exposed contacts, * then the high voltage will be available for human contact, and that is a * bad thing. * * With low voltage, the most that can happen would be a hot wire causing * a burn in the event of a short.Not really much else could happen.
FYI, NEC permits low voltage lighting with exposed contacts when the voltage is under 30 volts. That would still be for professionally installed systems. For what students might build I recommend 12 volts AND limited current (e.g. no car/boat/cart batteries). A stack of 8 alkaline D cells should be enough. A wall wart with 12 volts and 2 amps (AC or DC out) should be enough.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

Edison vs Westinghouse, round 2.
;-)
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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