Anodising Titanium?

Anyone know anything about anodising techniques for Titanium? I know
that there are a variety of colours that can be had, & that it is not
like Aluminium where the colour is a dye addded later, but I haven't
managed to find a description of how to get the different colours.
Regards,
Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
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What's this, Tony - a trendy deluxe Divisionmaster in an anodised Titanium case?
Cheers Tim Tim Leech Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
Reply to
timleech
You betcha!
Seriously, fancied using Ti to make clock wheels. Could make a really interesting-looking clock with anodised finish on them
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Heat. Test some scrap over a burner/ringstand with a screen for support. Play with the exposure till you get an exciting finish. It's a simple oxidation layer that scratches easily. -Bill
T> Anyone know anything about anodising techniques for Titanium?
Reply to
smith
A lot of titanium body jewellery is coloured. When I was at the tooling exhibition at the NEC I found a stand that coated cutting tools, TiAN, TiCN etc. They also did the decorative coating on body jewellery, I believe this was some kind of oxide coating from different gases. The colour depended on the gas used, the time and temperature I seem to remember.
I thought I had a brochure but cannot seem to find it. They were based somewhere in the Midlands. No idea what the cost would be. The coating is very thin, if the parts are polished first you can get some amazing results.
If I find the details I will send them to you offline.
Lionel
Reply to
Lionel
exhibition at the NEC I found a stand that
body jewellery, I believe this was some
used, the time and temperature I seem to
somewhere in the Midlands. No idea what the
can get some amazing results.
From
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May 24, 2001 Actually, Gene, anodizing titanium alloys to get pretty colors is rather simple. When my son was in 4th grade, he took the Chemistry section and almost won the overall prize in his school science fair with a project on using different electrolytes to color titanium.
Of the four solutions he used, he prefered the TSP over the table salt, the lemon juice, and the baking soda solutions, although they all worked well. Steve got the 24 volts he needed from four 6 volt batteries, and the CP titanium he used colored almost instantly. He felt the TSP gave a deeper color, but it might have been a trick of the light.
Bill Seeley wrote a couple of articles for Metal Progress and JOM in the early 80's, and one of his articles showed how the color is dependent on the voltage used. Heck, buy a bunch of batteries and check it out for yourself- it's kinda cool, and with a small setup you'll be able to paint the colors on.
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Lionel
Reply to
Lionel
I can tell you a little. The different colors are produced by different thicknesses of the oxide layer forming an interference filter. The thickness of the oxide layer is determined primarily by the voltage used in the anodizing. For my experiments, I used an artist's brush dipped in cleaning solution (an electrolite, some use lemon juice), with a turn of bare wire wrapped around the top of the bristles. That wire was connected to a power supply. The other lead of the power supply was clipped to the workpiece and the brush was used as a paintbrush. The colors range fom a dark amber to a deep blue with amber produced at about 20 volts and a bright blue at around 50. The speed of moving the brush and the spread of the brush will effect the color.
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Hi Tony, for what it's worth, Sheffield Hallam University has a special coatings division, mainly for hard coating cutting tools in R&D situations. It maybe worth contacting them, as your requirements could be interesting PR for them.... Well it's worth a try.
Joules
Reply to
Joules Beech

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