electrician, breaker and amps question regarding cost...

For our business. we had a 30 amp breaker put in at one point and 30 feet of coiled wiring ran to our server room...
This was to be for a UPS which required a 30 amp breaker..
Since that time, we opted to go with a very large ups.. which requires a 60 amp breaker.. (and heavier gauge wiring, i believe)..
We have had a few quotes so far..
It seems they would have to rewire the 30 foot distance, hardware into the back of the UPS and change the breaker from 30 to 60...
So far, quotes range from $1000-$1300 for this work..
Does this seem right? Is it that much more expensive (equipment cost?) from a 30 to 60 amp breaker? IE: i think the original work was around $450?
Thanks in advance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I should add, this is a 220volt line (208?).. i forget the exact value, but 2PH+G on the ups connection end..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't say how long ago you have the original circuit installed, but some points to consider.
1. Copper has almost doubled in price over the last year. 2. You are going from a #10 to a #6 wire gage (about a 125% increase in area) 3. Depending on the panel board type you are connecting into there may be a significant price jump for the larger breaker. 4. If the wiring is in conduit, it may need to be replaced with a larger size. 5. The existing 30 amp circuit must be removed as code no longer allows us to leave "spare" circuits in place in most conditions.
On the whole I would consider the $1000+ cost estimate to be fairly typical, particularly if a permit is now needed as this would typically be considered a feeder, not a branch circuit.
Dave WA Master Electrician WA PE Electrical
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the original wiring was done about a year ago..
Someone else thought these were the parts in question.. do they seem right?:
Breaker: $13.00 (Amazon.com product link shortened) Wire: 50' spool, 6/3, $130.00 http://www.doityourself.com/invt/5444195
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the original wiring was done about a year ago..
Someone else thought these were the parts in question.. do they seem right?:
Breaker: $13.00 (Amazon.com product link shortened) Wire: 50' spool, 6/3, $130.00 http://www.doityourself.com/invt/5444195
Breaker $13.00 Wire 50' Spool ,6/3 $130.00 Knowledge to not burn your business down or Kill someone ..... Priceless!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Trike Mike wrote:

We just had the work done..
The original estimate was $1250.. the new certified electrician charged $746 for the complete job, with a twist type plug for easy disconnect..
This was more along the lines of what i figured it would cost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It never ceases to amaze at how much people balk at the cost for an electrician. These same people pay $15 for a 10 minute haircut, or $90 an hour to a barber/hairdresser, then they'll pay their attorneys $200-$300 an hour for consultation fees over the most trivial of matters. But the minute an electrician tries to charge them $75 an hour to make sure their homes, businesses, family, employees are safe from an electrical fire, it's like whoa...why so much! A $1,000 for materials, labor, and the piece of mind to know that your business (and computers) are safe is a small price to pay. I say quit your belly aching and be grateful that you're not being charged what the job is really worth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are correct. The going rate for hiring an electrician around here is about $100 an hour, the same as plumbers. But the electrician only gets about $24 an hour on the check after all the deductions. So that is why the non licensed scabs are hired on the side. They charge about $40 an hour and go home happier than the legally licensed ones until they get caught by the inspectors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's be generous:
Let the electrician charge $100/hour. Give him 4 hours to do the job. The estimate still seems to be on the high side.
That said, for the time being the OP may be "stuck."
A lot of "subs" refuse to work on a "time & materials" basis but only quote the entire job. Since they still charge extra if they run into un-expected problems, it's a case of "Heads, they Win; Tails, you LOSE."
Try to find a honest, licensed guy who charges by the hour and just routinely use him whenever you have electrical problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Four hours? Where do you live...fantasy land? What about travel time, what about the time to go and pick up the materials from the supply house, what about setup and clean up? What about removing the old conduit and wiring before even starting the new one? What about moving all of the crap out of the way that most businesses (and homeowners) have laying around? What about the office time to do the invoicing? What about the time it took for the estimator to go and price the job in the first place? What about the permit? What about the second trip back to meet up with the inspector?
All of those times I just listed and the actual job hasn't even been done yet. All the customer sees is the end result, most have no idea of all of the other expenses and time involved that are burdened by the contractor. Then of course out of that $100 per hour, the taxman takes $45 right off the top and $25 goes to the employee. That leaves just $30 to cover insurances, vehicle repairs, $3.50 a gallon gas, medical benefits, running an office, paying a bookkeeper or accountant, office utilities, and on and on and on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@crosslink.net says...

Or just DIY. It's a lot simpler, cheaper, and better.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| snipped-for-privacy@crosslink.net says... |>
|> |> > |> |> Let's be generous: |> |> Let the electrician charge $100/hour. Give him 4 hours to do the job. |> The estimate still seems to be on the high side. |> |> That said, for the time being the OP may be "stuck." |> |> A lot of "subs" refuse to work on a "time & materials" basis but only quote |> the entire job. Since they still charge extra if they run into |> un-expected problems, it's a case of "Heads, they Win; Tails, you LOSE." |> |> Try to find a honest, licensed guy who charges by the hour and just |> routinely use him whenever you have electrical problems. | | Or just DIY. It's a lot simpler, cheaper, and better.
And best of all, it's FUN!
--
|WARNING: Due to extreme spam, googlegroups.com is blocked. Due to ignorance |
| by the abuse department, bellsouth.net is blocked. If you post to |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.