GFCI

Hey, a quick question. Does a plug-in GFCI need a three-wire grounded outlet to do it's thing, or can one safely use a 3-2 adapter?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The GFCI will work without a ground
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The difference being that with one, indirect contact (a fault to an exposed metal case) would cause it to trip a soon as the fault occurred, but without one it would need someone to touch it and start to receive a shock before it tripped. But either with or without one, the latter would occur with direct contact with live/ hot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes you can safely use a 2-prong adapter, or an appliance with only a 2-prong cord. A GFI works by looking for a difference in the current between the hot and neutral and has nothing to do with using a ground prong. Once there is a difference of 6ma or more between the hot and neutral prongs the GFI trips because it means that at least some of the current is coming out of the hot prong but is not going back on the neutral prong. This means the current is going somewhere else, such as to ground. Hence the name of a GFI device, Ground Fault Interrupter, or GFCI, Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.