Grounding Question(s)

I can not seem to find any listings for massachusetts electrical code(s)
for grounding an OTA antenna.
To be used for an Eave/gable mounted CM 4221 with a 5' mast
From what I can find it is recommended that I should ground the antenna,
the mast & the RG-6 with a grounding block.
ALL should be attached to a grounding wire in the most direct route.
With it ALL going to a ground rod in the earth.
Questions:
1) What gage ground wire should be used? i.e: 10AWG, 8AWG, 6AWG
2) Should I use a copper ground or Aluminum?
3) Stranded wire or Solid?
4) what length ground rod? How deep in the ground?
All input is greatly appreciated!
~J~
Reply to
JER67
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| I can not seem to find any listings for massachusetts electrical code(s) | for grounding an OTA antenna. | | To be used for an Eave/gable mounted CM 4221 with a 5' mast | | From what I can find it is recommended that I should ground the antenna, | the mast & the RG-6 with a grounding block. | | ALL should be attached to a grounding wire in the most direct route. | With it ALL going to a ground rod in the earth.
Ground the mast and antenna frame together and lead that down to a ground rod. Keep it away from other metal, but it can follow the mast if the mast goes into the ground.
Ground the coax arrestor to the same ground rod, but via a separate wire to the rod.
To prevent building up ground differential charges between antenna coax and power connections, the electrical service ground rod should be connected with this. Or just share the same one (but don't share the ground wires electrical service uses).
| Questions: | | 1) What gage ground wire should be used? i.e: 10AWG, 8AWG, 6AWG
This isn't electrical service ground, so smaller isn't such a big deal, but larger is better to some degree. You have to consider costs, too. Big wire costs big bucks. But in this case you are doing 2 things. One is keeping the antenna from building a charge that could bring in more lightning. And
| 2) Should I use a copper ground or Aluminum?
Whatever avoids an unlike metal joint. Else copper.
| 3) Stranded wire or Solid?
Stranded.
| 4) what length ground rod? How deep in the ground?
8 feet deep is a good idea. There are probably not specific requirements for an antenna purpose. Power purposes do have this requirement, but that is in part for other purposes.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
You say that like it is true in all cases. I know of situations where tying a service ground to a device ground is prohibited.
You mean that he shouldn't use the same mechanism that the cable company uses? Why do you say that?
What a useless response. He is asking for advice for selecting the gauge of the ground wire. You give him a nothing, not even a question about the length of the run (which would be pertinent). What a waste of carbon you are.
Even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in a great while.
Please provide a link that shows that stranded wire is required.
So, you ignorant, self centered, hypocritical blow hard, you know that a single 8' rod will work in his soil? What if he lives in the desert southwest? What if his soil is sandy and well drained? What if his soil is chemically acid/neutral/base? There are places where you may need to use several 8' ground rods and other places where a single 6' rod would be perfectly adequate.
Poor old phil, too bad that he is too ignorant, self centered, hypocritical and verbose to be useful at anything.
Matthew
Reply to
Matthew L. Martin
If you cared to look, the OP was citing he couldn't "seem to find any listings for massachusetts electrical code(s) for grounding an OTA antenna." So unless Massuchusetss has suddenly become the southwest, I think you're really far off base.
Reply to
FDR
Oh, get over yourself. There are plenty of places in MA where particular attention must be taken. Think Cape Cod and the Islands. Well drained sand is not very conductive wherever it is.
Matthew
Reply to
Matthew L. Martin
"Matthew L. Martin" wrote
Dry clay makes a pretty good insulator too.
--oTTo--
Reply to
Otto Bahn
And it is damned hard to pound a ground rod through, too.
Though a little lube helps.
Matthew
Reply to
Matthew L. Martin
Won't oiling the rod (FNARR!) will reduce the conductivity between the rod and the ground?
Thanks, Don
Reply to
Don Salad
|> |> >> Oh, get over yourself. There are plenty of places in MA where particular |> >> attention must be taken. Think Cape Cod and the Islands. Well drained |> >> sand is not very conductive wherever it is. |> > |> > Dry clay makes a pretty good insulator too. |> > |> |> And it is damned hard to pound a ground rod through, too. |> |> Though a little lube helps. | | Won't oiling the rod (FNARR!) will reduce the conductivity between | the rod and the ground?
He didn't say oil. Try water.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam

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