is roommate right about the cost of turning heat (gas) on briefly in the morning?


Wrong. I repeat! Water means water.
Boiler thermostats and safety devices are set so that temperatures NEVER approach that required to produce steam.
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Stuart Winsor

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wrote:

Look, Chucko... If the term BOILER is used, then the term STEAM applies.
If it is merely a HOT WATER system, then the device is NOT a boiler!
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snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

Wrong again, Dimbulb.

The furnace in a hydronic system is called a "boiler", Dimmie, just like the thing that convects heat is called a "radiator".
--
Keith

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If no steam is being produced, then the device in question is NOT a boiler.
In your hot water systems, the device is called a hydronic boiler. THAT is NOT a boiler.
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snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

The pedantic Dimbulb is at it again, folks. It is *called* a "boiler", even though it produces no steam, Dimmie. What would you call it, a dim bulb, Dimbulb?

^^^^^^

You can't even agree with yourself, AlwaysWrong. You must be a real piece of work to live around.
--
Keith

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What part of "'boiler' is one word, and 'hydronic boiler' is TWO WORDS" do you not understand, you retarded fuck?
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snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

You've just proved me right, Dimmie. It is you who doesn't understand the English language, Dimbulb. "Hydronic" modifies "boiler". "Boiler" is one word. That which heats water for space heating purposes is called a "boiler". That which heats air, for the same purpose, is called a "furnace". Now, go back to thinking up *new* ways of being wrong. This one is old.
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

Interestingly, in English English, a furnace would usually be something that is used to heat material to a very high temperature - eg to melt metals. The word wouldn't be used for something that merely heated air to a few tens of degrees above ambient.
Conversely, the Oxford English Dictionary defines a boiler as, "A fuel-burning apparatus for heating water, especially a device providing a domestic hot-water supply or serving a central heating system".
If the "boiler" is electrically powered, but doing the same job of heating water by a few tens of degrees - it would be called an immersion or hot water tank - and not a boiler.
--
Sue


















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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiler
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furnace
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_water_heater
The KiethTard is wrong on every count.
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ChairmanOfTheBored wrote:

I can't comment on the meaning of the words in American English. But there are, of course, many words that differ in meaning between America and England.
People walk on the pavement in the UK. They wear trousers over their pants. Teachers hand over a rubber to their students to use to correct their mistakes and not to prevent them..
This diagram shows a very typical central heating system in the UK:
http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/boilers.htm
"Boilers" -in the sense of a device for deliberately producing boiling water - is a term mostly confined to marine engineers.. in the UK.
There was actually a very serious accident in the UK recently, when a fauly central heating boiler did indeed produce boiling water. The diagram shows that a tank in the loft is used to hold feed water for the heating system. It also takes the excess as water in the system expands as it is heated. In this accident, the boiling water led to a lot of expansion and a lot of very hot water going up into the tank. The tank was made of plastic (again very typical) and softened - allowing its contents of several tens of gallons of water to pour out into the loft, through the ceiling and onto the bed of a child sleeping in the room below. Very, very sad.
--
Sue

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They aren't dictionary references.

So do we over here. We also walk on what we refer to as "sidewalks".

So do we, if we are going fishing in deep water.

Though some are still made of rubber, most erasers over here are now of a different media, at least as far as professionals go.

Nice illustrations.

Likely also where steam is used to turn turbines for electrical power generation.

I don't like hearing about sad news like that.
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@privacy.net says...

Dimbulb can't either.

...and get "knocked up" by the hotel staff in the morning.

This is quite similar to one of the heating plants commonly used in the US, except we don't normally have the "feed tanks", and never in the attic (if that's what the schematic is showing). Instead of the feed tanks the boiler and domestic water are fed from the city water or well (with perhaps a small storage/pressure tank). The boiler has a pressure reducer off the main water supply and usually an expansion tank to take up the slack.
Your diagram shows the option with the heat exchanger and storage tank for domestic water. That's fairly common, but more common is a separate heating coil in the boiler. Separate water heaters are also common, particularly if gas is available. I had the domestic coil because the boiler was converted from oil to natural gas and never got around to changing the hot water supply.

Steam boilers are also used in large commercial/industrial applications and some older homes. They're no longer used much for homes though.

Ouch! There was a steam accident recently in NYC where an underground steam main blew, killing a woman on the street above. High pressure steam can be nasty.
--
Keith

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<SNIP>

something
air
That qualifies also as a furnace here in the USA. What would a domestic force air furnace be called in the UK?
<SNIP>

That was not from the steam, but a hart attack. The injuries to the other victims are quite serious. I think one is still in the hospital. Thought the Tow truck driver and passenger (the tow truck ended at the bottom of the hole) both have been released for a while now.
--
Stephen B.
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 03:27:59 GMT, "Stephen B."

The steam rose 65 ft in the air from what I recall hearing.
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@privacy.net says...

What would you call something that heats air to heat a building?

Tell that to Dimbulb.
The boilers I've had heat both domestic and heating water. They've had a separate coil in the boiler for the domestic water, making the boiler more or less a tankless heater. Some use an external storage tank with a heat exchanger and a zone off the heating water to heat domestic water.

If it's used to heat domestic water it's called a "water heater". I've never heard of electricity used in a hydronic heating unit. Perhaps they're not used because the water has to be heated to at least 180F to get any efficiency out of the baseboard radiators.
--
Keith

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It is NOT an adjective when it is used as the moniker for the device.
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snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

You're an idiot. It certainly isn't a proper noun.
--
Keith

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The two words together are a MONIKER, and they BOTH form said MONIKER.
Get a clue, idiot.
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snipped-for-privacy@crackasmile.org says...

Wrong again.

After you, AlwaysWrong.
--
Keith

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Maybe, maybe not but they are considerably noiser and bulkier.
--
Stuart Winsor

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