Nema plug questions.


Of course you have to run away from anyone who corrects you.

You can't write, or think, for that matter. Everyone here knows this, too.

Oh, my! "Josepi" still hasn't grown up.

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Says the retarded, top posting, Usenet convention ignoring dumbfuck that cannot even spell "receptacle", but has no problems with 'bozobin' or Holy smokes" or other non-words.
Yeah, josepi, the Usenet convention ignoring retarded dumbfuck, you really have it on the ball! NOT!
You know nothing about elctrical power, and even your attempt to make yourself look knowledgeable via google further proves that you are nothing more than a coat-tail clinging twit.
Go BONE UP on Usenet posting convention, you retarded twit!
Otherwise, you are nothing more than a group abusing, interloping bastard. Your mother should be in prison for failing to flush you, the moment she shat you.
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On Monday, January 3, 2011 7:00:17 AM UTC-6, aooh11 wrote:

The National Electrical Code is the basic code for the US. It is adopted (sometimes with modifications) for most of the country.
The NEC requires, in general, "equipment required or permitted by this Code shall be acceptable only if approved" (110 2).
Approved is defined as "Acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction."
That is the inspector, or whatever adopted the code. UL listing will work. Listing by some other major testing labs probably will also. Testing here means samples of the equipment have been tested by the lab to determine if they meet the applicable standard. For switches, receptacles, ... the tests include many operations of the device, so it not only fails safely, it has a useful and safe life. Europe, I believe, the equivalent 'listing' process usually means the manufacturer certifies the device meets the appropriate standard.
Further, for receptacles, the NEC says the "receptacles shall be listed...." (406.2-A).
=================We used to call the receptacle you found "t-slots", and they were the standard receptacle used for replacement of 120V ungrounded receptacles. I looked in my junk, er.. salvage, boxes and found 4 of them. At least one is UL listed.
I think I remember from the dim past one plug on something that had 2 horizontal blades. I suspect that the horizontal parts are for compatibility with real old plugs.
-- bud--
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These configurations are all standard and well defined. I believe GE has a better, more comprehensive chart but 15 seconds of Googling got me this one.
http://www.hubbell-canada.com/wiring/bryant/pdf/b/b5.pdf
Each current, voltage and phasing capacity has it's own defined receptical configuration.
I thought they may have been some electrical people here.
The National Electrical Code is the basic code for the US. It is adopted (sometimes with modifications) for most of the country.
The NEC requires, in general, "equipment required or permitted by this Code shall be acceptable only if approved" (110 2).
Approved is defined as "Acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction."
That is the inspector, or whatever adopted the code. UL listing will work. Listing by some other major testing labs probably will also. Testing here means samples of the equipment have been tested by the lab to determine if they meet the applicable standard. For switches, receptacles, ... the tests include many operations of the device, so it not only fails safely, it has a useful and safe life. Europe, I believe, the equivalent 'listing' process usually means the manufacturer certifies the device meets the appropriate standard.
Further, for receptacles, the NEC says the "receptacles shall be listed...." (406.2-A).
=================We used to call the receptacle you found "t-slots", and they were the standard receptacle used for replacement of 120V ungrounded receptacles. I looked in my junk, er.. salvage, boxes and found 4 of them. At least one is UL listed.
I think I remember from the dim past one plug on something that had 2 horizontal blades. I suspect that the horizontal parts are for compatibility with real old plugs.
--
bud--



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On 3/1/11 16:58, in article xenUo.11419$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe07.iad, "Josepi"

Josepi,
I have seen many versions of the chart, but none of them shows the configuration that I was asking about, i.e. two 'T' shaped slots.
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Josephi has problems following conversations. It has been clear from the start that the receptacle you describe is not in the standard NEMA charts.
Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets toward the bottom "U.S. Combination duplex outlet" The receptacle is called there a "T-slot duplex outlet", about the same as what I called it. It is apparently obsolete - one of the old ones I have is UL listed but it is not, as you say, in the current NEMA configuration charts.
==========From the early days of electric power, I have seen a 'plug' that is the same as an Edison lamp screw base. It was on the end of a cord from something like a vacuum cleaner. You could 'plug it in' to a light fixture. The screw base would rotate relative to the cord.
I have also seen a wall receptacle that was the normal size plate, made of brass, with a round section in the center that would pivot open. Behind it was the equivalent of an Edison socket - an improvement to having to 'plug in' to a light fixture.
-- bud--
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Stephen Furley wrote:

The only version I've seen was used for 300 Ohm TV antenna outlets in the '50s. Later versions used the same pin size & spacing as popular crystals.
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"Seems to me" that configuration would be permitted in electrical sysems simply because it would accept both 120 and 240 volt plugs.
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On 25/1/11 16:09, in article eb2dnRDQQM53j6LQnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@posted.localnet, "John Gilmer"

Yes, but why? If something is fitted with a 240 V plug them presumably it's intended to operate from 240 Volts; why would you want to plug it into a 120V supply? At best it wouldn't work very well, it might not work at all, and if involved certain types of motor they could well stall and overheat.
These days it's quite common to find things, e.g. Computers, which are designed to operate on any Voltage from 100 - 250, so they an be used anywhere worldwide, but this was not the case when these receptacle was designed. I suppose that you could have something like a portable floodlight, fit it with a 240 V plug, and you could then plug it into either a 240 V receptacle, or 120 V via one of these, it you fitted the appropriate bulb. There are however a number of problems with this:
You couldn't plug it into 120 V via the much more common Nema 1-15 (at the time) or 5-15 receptacles, which are where you would me far more likely to need to connect it.
You could plug it into a 240 V supply while fitted with a 120 V bulb.
It's unlikely that such a thing would be run on 240 V in North America.
Was there a time before the current standards were drawn up when both horizontal and vertical bladed plugs were used for 120 V?
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I have an image capture of an old Sylvester vs. Tweety Bird cartoon that clearly shows a duplex outlet with T slots. Another thing odd about that particular image is the outlets themselves are rotated 90 degrees so that the plug would go in with one blade over the other.
I've never seen an outlet quite like that, I don't know how much is artistic license vs. based on an actual outlet like that.
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Michael Moroney wrote:

That is well known. The same for Eagle and a couple dozen other brands. However, those made for the US are clearly marked with the UL logo.

Then it was likely made for use outside the US. The construction and markings don't meet US reqirements for anything I've ever seen.
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.croydon.ac.uk wrote:

Early outlets had a dimple in the contacts to hold the plugs tighter. Then metalurgy advanced, providing springy contacts that provided more pressure while still allowing reasonable insertion pressure. the holes were retain to ensure compatibility with older outlets.

The ground contacts in a 120V NEMA outlet contact two or three sides of the pin, (Depending on the OEM) so as far as the outlet is concerned it is the same.
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