Power connection of 7KW induction hob in UK

Can someone advise that the normal method to connect such induction hob to the power supply in the kitchen of UK houses. Does it use a cable with both
ends of fixed connections to the junction boxes of hob and power outlet by no means of plug and socket? Does the power cable come with the hob normally or provide by the qualified installer?
Thanks,
Scott
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I waited to see if anyone else answered, as I haven't actually seen a 7kW induction hob. I assume this is a fitted item (not portable).
Assuming it's connected in the the same way as a conventional electric hob of that sort of power rating, it won't come with any lead -- the installer would have to provide one, and it would then be permanently wired in at both ends. The circuit would be fused at somewhere between 30A and 45A, and the cable conductor size could be between 4mm^2 and 10mm^2, partly depending on the circuit fuse rating, and partly on what cable the installer has handy.
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Andrew Gabriel
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writes:

Andrew,
Many thanks for your useful information. This is not a portable one and fitted one with 4 zones. Is there any standard reference for the fitting dimensions of this type of product?
Scott
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I don't know -- you could download the instructions for some inset hobs and see. The standard kitchen unit size in UK (and all EU I think) is exactly 600mm wide by approx 600mm deep, so you'd need to fit well within that if you want to fit on a standard unit. Gas hobs have strict requirements on side clearance from overhead cupboards manufacturer, which usually means there's very little scope for any movement in the positioning to fit under a 600mm wide extractor unit flanked by wall cupboards. There are no such overall rules for electric hobs, although the manufacturer can specify their own.
Common worktop thicknesses are 32mm and 40mm thick, and most hobs are designed to fit within the worktop depth so they don't hang below the underside of the worktop. Doesn't seem that important to me, but it probably makes it easier to fit in some cases.
In a tiny kitchen, appliances to fit in 500mm wide units are sometimes used, but there isn't a big choice of such compact appliances.
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writes:

Andrew,
Thanks for your useful info. Have a nice weekend!
Scott
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With the new induction hobs the power used does get quite high. Also with boost feature there is little or no diversity so 7Kw does need a full 32A supply it can't also feed the oven. This would likely on a new build be 6mm cable or over maybe Ali-tube rather than twin and earth so it does not need a RCD and as standard protected by a B32 MCB (Miniature circuit breaker) However with an induction hob this may need changing for a fuse specially designed for semi-conductors and one must carefully read the manufactures instructions.
Changing the supply protective device requires one to carefully measure earth loop impedance and prospective short circuit current (ELI + PSC) and this requires the use of expensive meters. Also the RCD if fitted may need testing again needing an expensive meter and all the results will need forwarding to local authority building control (LABC) in England or Wales if this is done by DIY you have to pay 100+ fee and inform them before you start under Part P.
As a result under most circumstances it is not worth doing DIY and it is both easier and cheaper to use a registered electrician.
The circuit will start at consumer unit (CU) to an isolator in kitchen then to a connection unit where the cable will change to a flex this may be 5 core if hob was intended for France and although you are allowed to replace items you can't change them without Part P notification and always a minor works or installation certificate should be completed.
Not really DIY
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[In UK] the circuit fuse/breaker is only to protect the circuit wiring, not the appliance. If the appliance requires specific fusing in order to remain safe which isn't covered by any likely circuit fuse in use (a likely max value would be 45A in this case), such protection must be included in the appliance by the manufacturer, and they mustn't rely on the circuit protection to do this.

Since the supply protective device should already be correct to protect the circuit wiring which is already installed, there is no reason to change it. (You might choose to double check that the protective device is appropriate for the circuit though.)
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