Power Requirements for New Gas Range

We are contemplating a new gas range for the kitchen to replace an aging, somewhat asthmatic electric range in use now. The one we want
requires "15A 120V service on a a dedicated breaker." The desired range will not have a convection oven, and as far as I can determine will require power for the controlling circuits only in the range.
There is a receptacle at the range location (in the wall behind where the range will be) whose breaker also feeds several receptacles in an adjacent room. Does anyone see a problem with using this receptacle for the new range's power?
TIA-- Terry--WB4FXD Edenton, NC
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Ya, you can use the receptacle at the range; it is plenty good. You do not need to use a dedicated breaker!!! The electric service for the gas range is just for the light and clock . . . .and even if it has fancy electronic, that will need very small current.

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AL BENSER wrote:

One minor caveat here: Many gas ranges have an electric igniter which includes a low current, high voltage supply and spark gap at each burner. Due to the possibility of coupling this high voltage into other devices sharing the same circuit, the range manufacturer prefers that you provide a dedicated circuit.
If you ensure that the circuit's grounding conductor is properly connected and the premises grounding system is properly bonded (particularly to metal plumbing such as the gas line), sharing a circuit shouldn't be a problem.
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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Not True. Some of the fancy high BTU ranges use a lot of current for the ovens,broilers etc. Our 15 year old Viking uses 3.5 amps each for the oven and broiler. A friend installed one for his boss with multiple ovens, broilers. etc. It took almost 20 amps if they were all on at the same time.
Chuck P.
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What's the big deal here? He said he is replacing an electric range. There is a 50 amp ckt there already. Easy to convert to a 20.
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The big deal is that the old circuit of 50 amp was on 220V which is totally different from a 110V !!!! the breakers and plugs do not match!!!

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=> =>Not True. Some of the fancy high BTU ranges use a lot of current for the =>ovens,broilers etc...........
And that is what has transpired since I first posted! There is a 1200W electric broiler element (in addition to the gas burner for baking) in tne oven for use in a "grille" mode (KitchgenAid) and I don't want to stress the old non-grounded fabric-wrapped wiring in this ancient domicile of mine any more than necessary! New 12-2 w/gnd is now installed and ready for the new range.
Thanks to all-- Terry--WB4FXD Edenton, NC
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