Unfused 13A plugtop "kettle" lead (UK)



Nope -- completely illegal to supply for any use.
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Andrew Gabriel

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The Plugs and Sockets (etc) Safety Regulations 1994 only apply to devices 'ordinarily intended for domestic use' - Paragraphs 4(1) and 11(1)(d)
Colin Bignell
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Palindr☻me wrote:

Ask your local Trading Standards.
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zaax

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zaax wrote:

Could it be Malaysian? They use the UK style plug and somewhere in the range 220-240VAC but probably (IMX, in fact, based on downright shoddy electrics in a 4 star hotel) have less stringent safety requirements.
Neil
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It is an offence under the Plugs and Sockets etc. (Safety) Regulations 1994...
"No person shall supply, offer for supply, agree to supply, expose for supply or possess for supply an electrical device unless [...] A standard plug shall contain or be accompanied by a fuse link which conforms to BS 1362. "
You should immediately inform Trading Standards, who will confiscate all the vendor's stock and prosecute. This is treated as a very serious offence. They may initiate a product recall too.

Assume not. If it's a loose mains lead, pick up a new one.
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Andrew Gabriel

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wrote:

I'm not sure. It certainly isn't if it is supplied for domestic use, but I don't know whether the rules regarding appliances being fitted with plugs applies to business sales.

Cables don't generally have voltage ratings, they have current ratings.
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You need both, really. The voltage determines the thickness of the insulation, at leats in theory. In practice, though, the insulation needs to be thick enough to withstand being pulled around, and that's probably the limiting factor, rather than the voltage.
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wrote:

Ummmm ... totally incorrect. The rating applies to the insulation of the wire.
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Cynic



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Supplied by who - a trader, ebay merchant, employer ?
I bought one from ebay a while ago like this, and the power supply probably won't last long enough to matter - make yourself an external PSU using a cheap PC power supply :-}

You can have notched and un-notched kettle plugs - the notch denotes its for "hot" use IIRC

In Hong Kong, I believe it might well be...
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Not even legal in Hong Kong. They have been a problem in Hong Kong with people bringing back cheap non-conformant products from Mainland China, but the Hong Kong authorities have been cracking down on these too recently.
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Andrew Gabriel

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There really must be a fuse of some sort somewhere, if not than as Andrew . It is possible there is one but is non replaceable. Similar concept to wall warts which have a thermal fuse built into the transformer.
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-
This is a bit confusing Sue. what do you mean by a 'power brick' ?
Do you mean a wall-wart- transformer ?
I guess not as you also talk about a mains lead, so it's confusing.
Can you give a link to the product ?
Joe Lee
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Joe Lee wrote:

One similar to this:
http://www.notebookreview.com/assets/14527.jpg
It takes in a mains supply (often a very wide range of them, say 90 - 250v) and gives out isolated very low voltages (in the case of an external hard drive unit, 12 and 5 volts dc).
As with the Vaio unit depicted, its mains input is typically by a socket on the unit and the unit is supplied with a standard mains lead for the country.
Similar to a wall-wart, although invariably a switch mode power supply with electronics and a high frequncy transformer - rather than the 50/60Hz one.
It isn't the brick that is the problem - it is the mains lead supplied. The latter does not meet UK regulations for mains leads.
--
Sue





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OK. I.m with you now. I think I may actually have one of these on my external HDD.
I'll have a good look at it & see what I can find.
Joe Lee
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Joe Lee wrote:

You managed to phrase your question in a rather annoying fashion. You rudely ask, "What do you mean by a 'power brick'?" Do you mean a wall-wart? as if 'wall-wart' is some kind of proper English (which it is not) and 'power brick' were some kind of weird bumpkin usage from god-knows-where. I guess you are American. From my (UK) point of view, "wall-wart" is American slang for the type of low voltage power supply which has prongs to fit into an AC outlet. It often has a lead terminating in one of the standard DC connectors for attachment to a piece of low voltage equipment.
I have plenty of those, for a camera, a portable CD player, a cable modem, a printer etc.
I also have a power brick. I believe they are used a lot with laptops. It is a fanless DC power supply which supplies my Shuttle small-form-factor PC. It has a 12v DC lead which plugs into the back of the PC. It also has a male socket on it which I believe is called a CEE inlet. It mates with a CEE connector on the mains lead, which has a moulded plug (with a fuse) on the other end. OK? I expect Sue was talking about one of these.
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Hi Sue
Take it straight to Trading Standards, it is totally illegal for use in the UK or Ireland. All 13A plugs in the UK should meet the requirements of BS 1363-1 and be fitted with a fuse meeting the requirements of BS 1362.
BillB
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snipped-for-privacy@abc.net wrote:

According to the regulations, does this fuse have to be replaceable? I could imagine that there is a fuse inside the moulded plug, you just can't get at it.
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Gareth wrote:

No way of telling - other than an Xray or sharp knife..
But, IIUC, the regulations reqire it to be replaceable.
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Sue


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Palindr☻me wrote:

Is there a 'kitemark' or 'CE' etc on the plug. If so it is most probably OK.
Look at the plug plastic very hard, there may be a cover pressed tightly in place containing a fuse. In such a case a 10A fuse would be quite OK since a device with a built in 'IEC' ('kettle') plug would have appropriate protection if it complies with usual standards (look for kitemark, 'CE' etc.
It you are still in doubt it is probably easier to buy or obtain another 'IEC' lead, there must be lots of them floating around from defunct computers and appliances - for a computer application, 'notched' or 'un-notched' IEC sockets on these leads are quite OK.
Assuming that Hong Kong does allow un-fused 13A plugs on these leads, this might be based on their own engineering studies which may very well show that the 30 amp cartridge fuse or MCB protecting a ring main would also quite adequately protect a 10A 'IEC' lead against short circuits.
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peterwn wrote:

No markings at all. No fuse cover. Much smaller than a normal one.

Unfortunately, whilst people will happily donate computer equipment to charities, they very often hang on to the power leads - so I am perpetually short of them. But this one won't be used.
--
Sue


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