USA to Australian power

G'Day All
I am in Australia where we have 220 volt power supply
If I use my battery chargers in a USA environment of 110 volt (with
the appropriate power plug adaptor) which of these would apply:-
1. Batteries would not charge at all
2. Batteries would charge but very slowly
3. Damage would be done to the battery chargers.
Thanks for any help
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Stubbo of Oz
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Stubbo of Oz wrote:

4. Not enough information.
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On Mon, 27 Sep 2010 20:20:47 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Thanks for reply
Charger 1 is the main one I asking about. Will this be unusable?
Chargers 2 and 3 indicate 100-240V input so am I right in assuming that they will work OK with USA 110V input? The instruction books don't give any indication.
Charger 1 - Used for AA NiMH batteries 1.2V 2200mAH Input 240VAC 50HZ 5W Outout 1.4 VDC 350 mA
Charger 2 - Mobile/Cell phone Battery Lithium-Ion 3.7V 1400mAh Input 100-240 VAC 50/60HZ 150mA Output 4.6 V 8 mA
Charger 3 - Electric razor Battery NiMH other details unknown Input 100-240 VAC 50/60HZ 7W Output 12 VDC 400mA
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Stubbo of Oz was thinking very hard :

Charger No1 will not function correctly in USA unless you get an adapter to run it un a US Heater/Dryer type socket. Chargers 2 & 3 are designed to operate correctly in either USA or Australia.
The supply in Australia is is nominaly 230 volts although many locations still have anyting up to 250 because the nominal used to be 240. The nominal in USA is 120Volts.
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wrote:

Thanks for reply - you say "....unless you get an adapter to run it in a US Heater/Dryer type socket" I presume you mean one that converts from 120 v to 230v?
Cheers ........
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Stubbo of Oz
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Stubbo of Oz presented the following explanation :

NO!! The big loads, dryers etc are usually connected to both legs of the supply which comes to the house giving 240 volts The 120 you see is from one leg to ground There are many plugs in use in USA but the simple ones are
| | 0 for 120 volts and
__ __
0 for 240 volts
The round pin is safety ground and tied to one of the pins in the 120 volt plug only at the building entrance box
Someone from USA could give the type numbers for thes plugs.
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wrote:

Many thanks for putting me straight, John. Your help is much appreciated
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Stubbo of Oz
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Stubbo of Oz wrote:

There are a lot of different outlets used in the US:
<https://www.hubbellnet.com/max_htm/tech_stuff/NEMA/front.html
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Michael A. Terrell explained :

Yes I knew that but was too lazy to look up the relevant lists.
Thankfully Australia has only one general purpose plug for up to 10 amps (2400va) and one with a bigger ground pin for loads between 10 and 15 amps. The smaller plug fits the bigger socket.
There are of course a series of 4 pin plugs for the 3 phase power which is available but not neccesarily connected, to almost any houshold.
John G.
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JohnG



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John G wrote:

20 A and under are only in a few types, but there are some high current plugs for big machines or trailers.
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wrote:

If he were to go purchase an adapter before coming over he would need a NEMA 6-15 to AS 3112 Adapter. R.
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This one... http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/532446-REG/Impact_APG_A_USA_APG_A_USA_Australia_to_USA.html R. Or, I'm an idiot and I'll just fade away into nothingness;/
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Yeah get the adapter above or capture and put a leash on tallywacker the troll, he's got enough juice and the right whole for everything in that filthy kit mouth of his. R. Bwahahahahahahaha
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You couldn't manage to wipe your ass correctly, boy.
Why? Because you ARE an asswipe.
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wrote:

--------------------------------- If charger 1 is the only problem- it will be easier and cheaper to simply buy a charger such as the one that I have that is 110-240V 50-60Hz with an output of 1.5V 0.4A (x2 as it handles 2 AA NIMH batteries) This (Panasonic DE-893 ) works in US, Canada, Italy and New Zealand (personal experience- even if I had to use a razor outlet in NZ). That way you get the internal electronics for proper charging of these batteries as well as the flexibility without a transformer. It fits a 2 prong "| |" outlet so that a cheap " ungrounded plug adapter" ( doesn't change voltage ) which is a sort of electrical "Swiss Army Knife" for this purpose.
http://international-electrical-supplies.com/plugadapters15.html
and is useable with the other chargers and available in many stores is something that you should have "just in case". A voltage changing device will be more expensive and will still require a "plug adapter"
You really don't want to plug it into a 240V dryer outlet as, if you are travelling, you may be staying in hotel rooms which don't have these outlets (as well as the available plugs for these outlets are rather cumbersome.
The following can help with the world wide variation in plugs/sockets
http://www.kropla.com/electric2.htm
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Don Kelly
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I haw blocked Earthlink users after seeing the kingdom of trolls on my monitor., only they use the giant 220vac plugs everywhere ;/
Though there are larger step up transformers, the one 'this 'particular topic requires is the small household version, for a travel-size battery charger., not, the streetcar named desire version, and not even the sized for Laundry Plug.....Or am I wrong about that...? R.
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So, you would need two adapters 1 to convert your Aussie 240V 50 Hz Class I *Outlets typically controlled by adjacent switch.To this :< 220V 50 Hz    Type C Electrical Outlet & F     Such as the one used in Armenia., Such wall wart is produced and available., Stubbo. No 220V Indoor Direct Adapter for that use, but there is usually a Standard US Laundry or Range Plug that would serve you but not comfortably accessible for daily plug n play use. R.     
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wrote:

Is there EVER ANY time when you are not a complete and utter TOTAL RETARD?

You are wrong about EVERYTHING you have ever stated in this group about electronics or electrical wiring or power distribution.
THAT is your legacy, Roy.
That, and the FACT that you are too pussified to post as *YOU*.
Ever heard the expression "run out of town on a rail"?
It is a goddamned shame that we cannot run you out, asswipe. I would use a razor blade instead of a rail, and it would end with you in a vat of alcohol, bug killer, and disinfectant.
Not to get the bugs off of you, but to get the YOU bug off of US.
GO AWAY, Roy.
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High power devices in the US use 240 volts, not 120V. An electric dryer outlet, if it exists where you will be staying, is a potential source of 240V power, but someone would have to make a dryer cord to Ausstralian outlet adapter (and do so safely).
Another option is a small transformer that will convert 120V to 240V with a proper outlet. Electronics places sell the reverse version (240V->120V to allow American devices to work overseas) and may sell this but I suspect they'll be overpriced for what may be a one-time need, also transformers tend to be heavy.
Another option is to buy a universal adapter in the US that converts AC to the voltage/current you need with the right connector for your device. Who knows whether they exist for what you need.
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On Sep 28, 1:02pm, snipped-for-privacy@world.std.spaamtrap.com (Michael Moroney) wrote:

That is all he needs., the Appropriate Adapter as he mentioned. Normally a 110 to 220 converter won't work well for a large appliance or anything motorized. A battery is low voltage and non-inductive..it will charge fine with the power adapter. They are not that big, about the size of a regular wall wart. R.
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