What is electrical resonance ?



a) What exactly is electrical resonance and how is it caused and what is it's result/effect? b) What exactly is thermal resonance and how is it caused and what is it's result/effect?
Thanks Anton
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| |> Resonances need not be just physical movement, its normal to have |> electrical and even thermal resonances under the appropriate conditions. |> | | a) What exactly is electrical resonance and how is it caused and what is | it's result/effect?
It is a repeating pattern in the dimension of time.
Typical resonance can be described as something that can move back and forth in a finite way. An electrical resonance would be as simple as a current moving back an forth between the ends of a wire which makes a fine antenna element at that frequency. Or it can be current moving back and forth between a capacitor and inductor that can store a charge for some period and release it.
| b) What exactly is thermal resonance and how is it caused and what is it's | result/effect?
I would presume it to be a thermal change propogating and returning, then repeating that process.
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in article snipped-for-privacy@news3.newsguy.com, snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net at snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote on 4/8/05 8:47 AM:

There is no such thing. To make a long story short, there is nothing equivalent to thermal inductance.
Bill
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wrote on 4/8/05 8:47 AM:

If we had a heat powered refrigerator operating with its evaporator discharging heat into the refrigerator and into the unit that vaporizes the refrigerant operating in balance, wouldn't this be thermal resonance?
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in article 42582d59$ snipped-for-privacy@news.acsalaska.net, Gerald Newton at snipped-for-privacy@acsalaska.net wrote on 4/9/05 12:30 PM:

Huh!
If you mean that you can heat up a rock in your fireplace and then use the hot rock to keep warm after the fire goes out, it is not resonance. It is the equivalent of charging up a capacitor and then discharging it.
Now if you had a magic rock that allowed cooling down below the ambient temperature, I would look at that more carefully.
Bill
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A state in which the capacitance and the inductance values in a circuit are equal (net reactance is equal to zero) and the only quantity left is resistance.
research series resonant and parallel resonant (tank) circuits.
the result/effect is a tuned circuit.

beats me :) try alt.engineering.mechanical

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in article snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.com, TimPerry at snipped-for-privacy@noaspamadelphia.net wrote on 4/9/05 9:03 PM:

There are a number of ways to define it. For my money, I can define it as a circuit in which stored energy sloshes back and forth between electric field energy and magnetic field energy. In a way, this is analagous to potential energy stored in a mechanical capacitor and the kinetic energy in a mechanical inductor.
If you are truly interested, study the common lagrangian formulation of electrical ciruitry and mechanical configurations. This formulation uses generalized coordinates.
Bill
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The way I learned this was: When XC = XL in a parallel LC circuit we have resonance and current travels back and forth between a capacitor and an inductor. This circuit has minimum impedance to a wave traveling at a resonance frequency found by: XC = 1 / 2 x pi x freq in hz x C in farads XL = 2 x pi x freq in hz x L in henries Set XL equal to XC and solve for the resonance frequency.
f = 1 / (2 x pi x SQRT(LxC)
It is all explained in detail at: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_6/2.html
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