Whole house surge suppressors

This is a most informative article, and it echoes what w_tom says: http://www.ecmweb.com/mag/electric_hit_grounding_home/
So when I call an arbitrary electrician to ask for a grounding survey, how do I know he's telling me the truth?
Do I have to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars to purchase a ground tester?
This is for a single family home that I have lived in for about 7 years, and will probably continue to live in for about 7 more years.
Since I'm having electrical work done, I would also like something like this: http://scientificsonline.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_3108400 installed at my breaker box; it would be nice if it could break down it's info by each breaker; and it would also be nice if it could tell me how much current is flowing through my ground connection.
Here are random URLs of info: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm p7ov4as6j8rj82pd3nv4fhl27dc2adm0%404ax.com&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26selm%3D0ap7ov4as6j8rj82pd3nv4fhl27dc2adm0%25404ax.com
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&threadm?0A5E47.FF0175D2%40hotmail.com&rnum=2&prev=/groups%3Fnum%3D100%26hl%3Den%26lr%3Dlang_en%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26scoring%3Dd%26as_drrb%3Db%26q%3D%2Bfranklin%2Bgroup%253Aalt.certification.a-plus%2Bauthor%253Aw_tom%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch%26as_mind%3D12%26as_minm%3D5%26as_miny%3D2002%26as_maxd%3D25%26as_maxm%3D8%26as_maxy%3D2003
http://amasci.com/amateur/whygnd.html http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm <0bf1a2%241%40news.alcatel.com&rnum=3&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dground%2Bneutral%2Bhot%26ie%3DUTF-8%26hl%3Den%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm=8gdgt7%24esp%241%40news.efn.org&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dground%2Bneutral%2Bhot%26ie%3DUTF-8%26hl%3Den%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm=rLpu0fAF53T6EwcJ%40lineone.net&rnum=8&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dground%2Bneutral%2Bhot%26ie%3DUTF-8%26hl%3Den%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm=w5nsc.34575%24zw.8611%40attbi_s01&rnum &prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dground%2Bneutral%2Bhot%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26start%3D10%26sa%3DN
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm=U%25046.32481%24bw.2026859%40news.flash.net&rnum &&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dground%2Bneutral%2Bhot%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26start%3D20%26sa%3DN
Here is a summary of models I have found, and some anecdotes from Usenet:
MODEL: Panamax Primax RESELLER: SmartHome.com http://www.smarthome.com/4839.html JOULES: 2700 AMPS: 60,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120/240 1 Phase, 50/60 Hz RESPONSE TIME: 8x20 microseconds PRICE: $119.99 WARRANTY: the manufacturer provides a 3-year Connected Major Appliance Protection Policy up to $10,000 for the repair or replacement of major household appliances (refrigerator, freezer, oven, range, washer, dryer, ceiling fan or dishwasher) and a 5-year product warranty. URLS: - Press Release: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=panamax+surge&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&selm bd5cec%24605a2680%2477003dce%40oemcomputer&rnum=3
- Negative Experiences: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=panamax+surge&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&selm=7nsc8t%24fo1%241%40nnrp1.deja.com&rnum=4
- More Negative Experiences: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&threadm bcf42f%24f7de1be0%240100007f%40blyle&rnum=8&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26edition%3Dus%26q%3Dpanamax%2Bsurge%26btnG%3DSearch
MODEL: Leviton 51120-1 RESELLER: SmartHome.com http://www.smarthome.com/4860.html JOULES: 950 AMPS: 50,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: RESPONSE TIME: "Instantaneous" PRICE: $189.99 WARRANTY: URLS: - Positive Comment: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&threadm=tia8dac62nojbf%40corp.supernews.com&rnum=4&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dleviton%2Bsurge%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26edition%3Dus%26selm%3Dtia8dac62nojbf%2540corp.supernews.com%26rnum%3D4
- Negative Comment: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=leviton+surge&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us& snipped-for-privacy@26686F.ECD70A%40hotmail.com&rnum=3
- Positive Comment: http://groups.google.com/groups?qQ120+leviton&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm7864104.3D18F1FD%40ibm.net&rnum=2
MODEL: Panamax gpp8005 RESELLER: PowerSystemsDIRECT http://www.powersystemsdirect.com/Panamax/Service_Entrance_Protector_Whole_House_Surge_Primax_gpp8005_55.php
JOULES: 2,700 AMPS: 60,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120/240 1 Phase 50/60Hz RESPONSE TIME: PRICE: $99.99 WARRANTY: Connected Equipment Policy Length 3 Years; Connected Equipment Policy Amount $10,000; Lightning Protection Yes URLS: Model description:
MODEL: Intermatic IG1240RC RESELLER: SmartHomeUSA.com http://www.smarthomeusa.com/Shop/Lighting/Surge-Suppressors/Item/IG1240RC/
JOULES: 1,200 AMPS: 48,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120/240V 60Hz RESPONSE TIME: Less than 5 nanoseconds PRICE: $69.95 WARRANTY: $10,000 warrantee URLS: - Positive: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&threadm=7ukvpr%24dja%241%40news.mks.com&rnum=2&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dpanamax%2Bprimax%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26edition%3Dus%26selm%3D7ukvpr%2524dja%25241%2540news.mks.com%26rnum%3D2
- Positive: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&threadm=dschneid.367.000B7827%40nicmad.nicolet.com&rnum=2&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26edition%3Dus%26q%3Dintermatic%26btnG%3DSearch
- Positive: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=intermatic&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&selm7FC7F0A.37E63B3A%40nni.com&rnum=3
- Informational: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=intermatic+surge&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us&selm ½agtd%24paf%40acadia.ee.vill.edu&rnum=2
MODEL: Intermatic PanelGuard IG1300-4T-2C, protects (?) phone-lines and cable lines too RESELLER: JOULES: AMPS: 48,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120/240 single (split) phase, 4 telephone lines, and 2 coax cable lines; ALL MODE PROTECTION (L1-N, L2-N, L1-G, L2-G, N-G, L1-L2); 150 Volt MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) [AC Protection]; 350 Volt Gas Tube [Telephone Protection]; 90 Volt Gas Tube [Coax Cable / Satellite Protection] RESPONSE TIME: PRICE: IG1300-2T is $152.83 at http://www.aplussupply.com/intermatic/pg5000/ig1240.htm WARRANTY: $10,000, 5 year warranty URLS: - Non-negative: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm8e3ov8gs057mmtgpgq3loqfodtq1odneq%404ax.com&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fq%3DIG-1300%26ie%3DUTF-8%26hl%3Den%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch
- Positive: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm ½c56s%24q5q%40acadia.ee.vill.edu&rnum=2&prev=/groups%3Fq%3DIG-1300%26ie%3DUTF-8%26hl%3Den%26btnG%3DGoogle%2BSearch
MODEL: Ditek DTK-WH8 Whole House Kit RESELLER: StayOnline http://www.stayonline.com/panel_surge_protectors/3233.asp JOULES: 1050 AMPS: 125,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120 / 240 Split Phase ; Suppressed Voltage Rating: 700V (L-L), 400V (L-G, L-N, N-G) RESPONSE TIME: Less than 5 nanosecond PRICE: $149 WARRANTY: URLS:
MODEL: PolyPhaser IS-PM120-SP RESELLER: PolyPhaser.com JOULES: AMPS: 40,000 CIRCUIT TYPE: 120Vac, 1 Phase, 2 Wires & GND RESPONSE TIME: ?? Turn-On Time: 25ns ?? PRICE: WARRANTY: URLS: - Positive: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=leviton+surge&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&edition=us& snipped-for-privacy@26686F.ECD70A%40hotmail.com&rnum=3
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drivel snipped
If your trying to protect from lightning then you need a lightning protection system. try UL-96A for the specs. Every system I installed helped a little when the strike came. Nothing is guaranteed protection for lightning way to many variables.
IEEE has standards for surge protection, they come in 3 categories. Distribution, service and point of use. You need 2 out of 3 to have decent protection. Since distribution is handled by the serving utility we now have two to work with. There are 2 basic types of surge protection devices, MOV's and the rest. MOV's are tested once. So they will do their job once, a second hit,,, who knows.
Grounding and installation are the most important. The average Joe electrician is not going to have an ground tester. Are you planning a 3 point or 4 point test? I used to use 3 point a lot, also called fall of potential. 4 point I used for measuring the soil resistively for installation of ground systems. Then there are the clamp on ground testers which can do the job with out shutting down the electrical service for a test. http://www.electricitymetering.com/category/detail.scd-pscdrv230100276-selectedzq111zq2scdrv230100401-selectedzq111zq2scdfa-230100401-selectProduct-idzq3258zq4category_idzq379zq1true . The most important thing here is the guy running the meter. It takes a fair amount of experience to understand what the readings mean. Try to achieve less than 5 ohms during your driest times. You can always add more ground rods to the electrical service to get the readings lower. I once had to add 2-40' long chemical ground rods to a service to get it to 2 ohms. These must be installed per the local and national codes.
The wires should be short as possible for connecting your surge arrestor. CH and other manufactures make units that connect to the buss for services. SQD has one for the homeline panel that plugs in like a breaker. The most important part is to have the let through at the service arrestor be below the threshold of the point of use arrestor. You can put that warranty crap in you peace pipe and smoke it. I used to work for an OEM and they NEVER paid a single claim in 8 years for arrestors. You will never be able to prove the unit ever failed to work. Make the best choices you can and hope for the best.
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I have 2 point protection - service and point of use. I have had 2 lightning strikes in the past few years and have had no power related damage. However, both times it wiped out my tv's by coming in the cable tv line. Last week it got 3 tv's ($2500 loss). Sure wish there was a better way of protecting the cable.

They usually blow open so you don't know they're not working. I have only seen one blow to a short - kept popping a breaker.

I have had to pour 50# bags of rock salt around ground rods in sandy soil to get less than 5 ohms. Have had to cad-weld rods end-to-end and go down 50 ft. to get a good ground. Have also had to create a ground field of up to 12 interconnected rods. Sometimes you just do what you have to do!

And the fine print says you have to have affidavits from all utility companies, service providers, and home insurance companies stating they will not pay for losses before the arrestor company will even accept your claim.
Bob S.
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And again we have this misconception that a 'service entrance' and a 'point of use' protectors are protection. Again, protectors and protection are two different components in a protection 'system'. Again, protection is that single point earth ground. Protectors are only electrical switches or connections to that single point ground. A protector without that single point earth ground is doing nothing effective.
The CATV line is as easy to protect as all other incoming utility wires. It must first make a connection to single point earth ground - the protection - before entering the building. Newly revitalized cable companies are now teaching their employees this 60+ year old technology. Technology that long understood and that repeatedly proven. And yet still, here in the 21st Century, we still have people 'assuming' a protector is protection. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. How does the incoming cable get protected? Throw away the protector and connect that incoming cable direct - hardwired - to single point earth ground. No earth ground means no effective protection.
Why might the TV be damaged on its cable connection? If cable was properly earthed, then incoming transient is on some other utility. One typical incoming source is the AC electric (especially if appliance is connected to an adjacent plug-in protector). Incoming on AC electric, through TV, and outgoing to earth ground via cable. First everything in an electrical path from cloud to ground conducts the transient. Only then does one device in that path fail - often a component on TV's cable connection. Many then assume the surge came in on cable when, in reality, surge was incoming on AC electric and outgoing on cable connection.
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Bob S.) wrote in message

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<snip>


Do you have surge suppressors that provide surge reference equalization? What that means is a surge suppressor with power and cable protection in the same box. Even if the grounds for both electric and cable service are grounded at the same point, it is still possible to end up with an induced potential between them at your television. The suppressor with both power and cable protection will clamp this potential at a safe level.
Charles Perry P.E.
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Appliances already have effective internal protection. With a properly installed 'whole house' protector and the so critical earth ground, then any induced potential inside the building will remain well below what appliances are designed to withstand. A 'whole house' protector may not be perfect. But with it, residual transients inside a building should remain at below what appliances must withstand; below those ratings of appliance internal protection.
Anything that can be effective adjacent to the appliance is already inside that appliance. One of the early requirements for such internal protection was the CBEMA. Even Intel specifications for power supplies require sufficient internal protection. Internal protection that assumes the 'whole house' protector exists and that all incoming utilities are properly earthed to the single point earth ground.

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Tom you are contradicting yourself. How can an appliance protect itself if it doesn't have a ground connection in the power plug? Charles is on target when he says a point of use protector is there to clamp all inputs of an appliance to a common point. They also soften the leading edge of a transient with inductive componants. You certainly need to stop as much of this as you can at the service/utility entrance but with close strikes you can still get a surge induced into the building wiring beyond the entrance. This is what the point of use protector is for. Effective protection is composed of layers that absorb surges wherever they occur. If you really want 7/24 operation in a lightning rod place like Florida you will have a system of grounding and bonding along with devices that shunt transients to ground and absorb those that don't get shunted. You provide more attractive paths to ground with copper and less attractive paths to equipment around iron.
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Appliances have galvanic isolation. Part of the internal protection provided inside the appliance. Adjacent shunt mode protectors (which providde no galvanic isolation) are not effective which is why plug-in protectors enrich their manufacturers rather than provide effective protection. Again, if those $0.10 parts inside a plug-in protector were effective, then those parts would be routinely installed inside all appliances.
Appliances already have any protection that works at the appliance. Protection that can be overwhelmed if the 'whole house' protector connected short to the single point earth ground is not installed. And so we say no earth ground means no effective protection.
I have even traced surge damage through a network of powered off computers simply because the homeowner had 'point of use' protectors and no 'whole house' protector. The 'point of use' or plug-in protectors completed a circuit used by surge to enter computers. What kind of protection was that? Exactly same as the plug-in manufacturer's technical specifications claim.
Is a plug-in protector necessary? Yes, if the defective 'whole house' protector system is permitting 2000+ volt transients inside a building. But then the homwowner is also replacing GFCIs and dimmer switches frequently. Those electronic furnace controls and dishwasher failures define a defective protector system. But a properly installed 'whole house' protector (costing about $1 per protected appliance) connected to a properly earthed ground would never permit that kind of transient across the appliance.
Furthermore, what is the most cost effective method of improving household protection? Do we install a 'point of use' protector on everything - the furnace, bathroom and kitchen GFCIs, alarm system, every clock radio, touch on-off lamps, dimmer switches, dishwasher, etc? Of course not. No one is going to spend $15 or $50 for each of 100 electronic appliances. Plus many of those devices most easily damaged by transients are installed in the wall. Where does the 'point of use' protector go?
'Point of use' protector is a shunt mode protector. Shunt mode protectors are all but useless without the less than 10 foot connection to single point ground. In fact many are so grossly undersized as to be damaged by a surge that was too small to overwhelm internal appliance protection. Sounds more like a scam than a protection system. Effective protectors are properly sized so as to not be damaged during a surge.
Bottom line remains. The 'whole house' protector and single point earth ground make even the appliance's own internal protection effective. And as posted previously, the human must also inspect the primary protection system as demonstrated by pictures at: http://www.tvtower.com/fpl.html
None of this is discussed by plug-in protector manufacturers since effective protection is not even claimed. They are selling on half truths in a hope that other naive users will recommend their product. A classic example of myths promoted is, "My surge protector sacrificed itself to protect my computer". Reality is plug-in protector was so grossly undersized as to be damaged by a transient too small to damage adjacent computer. Internal protection inside the computer is again demonstrated.
BTW, surge protectors absorb surges just like wire also absorbs surges. Neither are installed to absorb the energy. Effective layers of protection are defined by layers of grounds; not layers of protectors. Defined above is the 'primary' protector and its earth ground. Then the 'secondary' protector - the 'whole house' protector and its earth ground. To have layers of protection, one must then have layers of grounding. Grounding - not the protector - defines layering. If protectors absorb surges, then so do wires. Grounding defines each layer of protection.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote in message

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w_tom wrote:

Not true. An MOV type protector will NOT conduct heavily without absorbing energy. It takes energy to change the MOV from high resistance to low resistance - that is not true of wire. The energy that it takes to change the MOV from high resistance to low resistance and keep it in the low resistance state is absorbed and dissipated in the MOV, until the MOV blows or the surge it "sees" disappears. Wire stays in a low resistance state, regardless - it does not need to absorb energy to change states nor to remain in the low resistance state. Wires on not rated in terms of the surge energy thay can absorb - MOV's are.
While in the low resistance state, everything in the current carrying path, including the wire and the MOV and anything else through which current flows, absorbs and dissipates energy in accordance with Ohm's law. In that case - where the MOV is already in the low resistance state - your statement is correct, but incomplete. The wire can absorb and dissipate FAR more energy than the MOV. That makes the MOV's capability of absorbing energy a critical factor, because it will blow long before the wires will melt. For example, a 14 gauge wire will happily conduct 10 amps essentially forever - an MOV will expire very quickly at that current.
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A wire will not conduct energy heavily without absorbing energy. Therefore is the purpose of wire to absorb energy? Of course not. Every conductor including MOVs absorbs some energy when conducting electricity. Does that mean the purpose of all conductors is to absorb that energy? Of course not. The purpose of an MOV is to shunt current; minimize the energy absorbed while conducting electricity - just like a wire.
Does an MOV conduct energy better than a wire? Of course not. But that still does not make the purpose of an MOV to absorb energy.
We want the MOV to absorb less energy; to shunt more current. How do we do this? We increase a surge protector's joules rating. More joules means a surge protector will absorb even less energy - just like a larger wire. Furthermore, an MOV protector with a higher joules rating means a surge is less likely to find other, destructive paths to earth ground. Therefore we want protectors with higher joules rating - so that the protector absorbs less energy - just like bigger wires.
Higher joules means a surge protector has a longer life expectancy and acts like a better wire. Purpose of an MOV is not to absorb joules which is why we want MOVs with higher joules ratings.
snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net wrote:

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w_tom wrote:
Your statement was: " BTW, surge protectors absorb surges just like wire also absorbs surges."
That statement was shown to be incorrect. Nothing in what you have posted below makes your statement correct or addresses what I posted in response to your statement.

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Thank you for a well researched response.
snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net wrote:

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Appliances have galvanic isolation. Part of the internal protection provided inside the appliance. Adjacent shunt mode protectors (which providde no galvanic isolation) are not effective which is why plug-in protectors enrich their manufacturers rather than provide effective protection. Again, if those $0.10 parts inside a plug-in protector were effective, then those parts would be routinely installed inside all appliances.
Appliances already have any protection that works at the appliance. Protection that can be overwhelmed if the 'whole house' protector connected short to the single point earth ground is not installed. And so we say no earth ground means no effective protection.
I have even traced surge damage through a network of powered off computers simply because the homeowner had 'point of use' protectors and no 'whole house' protector. The 'point of use' or plug-in protectors completed a circuit used by surge to enter computers. What kind of protection was that? Exactly same as the plug-in manufacturer's technical specifications claim.
Is a plug-in protector necessary? Yes, if the defective 'whole house' protector system is permitting 2000+ volt transients inside a building. But then the homwowner is also replacing GFCIs and dimmer switches frequently. Those electronic furnace controls and dishwasher failures define a defective protector system. But a properly installed 'whole house' protector (costing about $1 per protected appliance) connected to a properly earthed ground would never permit that kind of transient across the appliance.
Furthermore, what is the most cost effective method of improving household protection? Do we install a 'point of use' protector on everything - the furnace, bathroom and kitchen GFCIs, alarm system, every clock radio, touch on-off lamps, dimmer switches, dishwasher, etc? Of course not. No one is going to spend $15 or $50 for each of 100 electronic appliances. Plus many of those devices most easily damaged by transients are installed in the wall. Where does the 'point of use' protector go?
'Point of use' protector is a shunt mode protector. Shunt mode protectors are all but useless without the less than 10 foot connection to single point ground. In fact many are so grossly undersized as to be damaged by a surge that was too small to overwhelm internal appliance protection. Sounds more like a scam than a protection system. Effective protectors are properly sized so as to not be damaged during a surge.
Bottom line remains. The 'whole house' protector and single point earth ground make even the appliance's own internal protection effective. And as posted previously, the human must also inspect the primary protection system as demonstrated by pictures at: http://www.tvtower.com/fpl.html
None of this is discussed by plug-in protector manufacturers since effective protection is not even claimed. They are selling on half truths in a hope that other naive users will recommend their product. A classic example of myths promoted is, "My surge protector sacrificed itself to protect my computer". Reality is plug-in protector was so grossly undersized as to be damaged by a transient too small to damage adjacent computer. Internal protection inside the computer is again demonstrated.
BTW, surge protectors absorb surges just like wire also absorbs surges. Neither are installed to absorb the energy. Effective layers of protection are defined by layers of grounds; not layers of protectors. Defined above is the 'primary' protector and its earth ground. Then the 'secondary' protector - the 'whole house' protector and its earth ground. To have layers of protection, one must then have layers of grounding. Grounding - not the protector - defines layering. If protectors absorb surges, then so do wires. Grounding defines each layer of protection.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote in message

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W-Tom sells a whole house suppressor (Polyphaser I think)
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I have no connection to any company that I have listed as an example. If I was promoting Polyphaser, then why do I recommend so many other company products? I am an engineer with a great distaste for those who promote myths as if they were technical facts. Based upon what I have posted, then one would suspect I am selling earth ground. I would if I could just patent it.
Greg wrote:

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Oddly you dismiss the test results of research labs.
Charles Perry P.E.
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I did not dismiss results of research labs. I have insufficient details of those lab results to even review. Furthermore I have seen plug-in protectors contribute to damage of adjacent equipment when installed in a building without a properly earthed 'whole house' protector. Those lab results should not contradict real world examples. And so I have serious problems with lab conclusions that come from a so credible source. They were not dismissed. They were contrasted to so many real world examples and the underlying theory.
A special note is required here. Some posters who have substantial credibility. Charles Perry is on that list. I just cannot agree with his conclusions that plug-in protectors will enhance a protection system because 1) appliance internal protection makes the plug-in protectors redundant if a properly installed 'whole house' protector and single point earth ground is installed. Furthermore, 2) plug-in protectors are grossly overpriced for what they claim to accomplish and are often grossly undersized. 3) If the plug-in protector were so effective, then those inexpensive components would already be inside that appliance. The plug-in protector does not even have the dedicated, short connection to single point earth ground. Somehow the plug-in protector will earth long distance to same earth ground used by the 'whole house' protector; the secondary protection system? Just not reasonable.
Furthermore, 4) devices that require protection such as GFCIs, dimmer switches, digital timer switches, dishwasher, smoke detector, etc - what protects these? Not a plug-in protector. If 'whole house is required for these, then what is another protector connected too far from earth ground suppose to accomplish? Just another reason why I see no reason to spend so much money on a device that does not even claim to protect from the typically destructive common mode transient.
Anything that an adjacent protector is going to accomplish is already installed in the appliance - if that adjacent plug-in protector was effective. And again, 5) I have even seen plug-in protectors contribute to damage of adjacent, powered off computers. Five reasons why I have no use for plug-in protectors. Top of that list - excessive money for a protector that is may even be grossly undersized and does not even claim to protect from the typically destructive surge.
Charles Perry wrote:

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I have no connection to any company that I have listed as examples of effective protetion. I might be employed by a company that makes ineffetive protectors. Your guess? If I was promoting Polyphaser, then why do I recommend so many other company products? I am an engineer with a great distaste for those who promote myths as if technical facts. Based upon what I have posted, then you should have said I am selling earth ground. I would if I could just patent it.
Greg wrote:

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I appologize. I was misinformed
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No reason to apologize. I am rather amused or made entertainingly curious as to how such a conclusion could be drawn. Such a comment also is not at all insulting; and maybe complementary. Still, can you suggest a business plan to corner the market on earth ground?
Greg wrote:

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